No Title

2007bm1623 jpg l

View the V&A API .json response

Acquired in 1913 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
attributions_note
bibliography
Liefkes, Reino and Hilary Young (eds.) Masterpieces of World Ceramics in the Victoria and Albert Museum. London: V&A Publishing, 2008, pp. 24-25.
collection_code
EAS
credit
date_end
0008-12-31
date_start
date_text
206 BC-8 AD (made)
descriptive_line
Storage jar, stoneware with incised and combed decoration and olive-green glaze, Zhejiang Province, China, Western Han dynasty (206 BC- AD8)
dimensions
Height: 32.0 cm, Diameter: 21.4 cm
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
gallery
World Ceramics, room 145
historical_context_note
historical_significance
history_note
Bought from S.M. Franck & Co
id
99962
label
Green-glazed storage jar China, Zhejiang province Western Han dynasty (206 bc–ad 8) The clays of southern China need a relatively high temperature to mature. This led to advances in kiln technology, and by 1500 bc southern Chinese potters were using firing temperatures up to 1200ºC. The stonewares they made were the world’s first high-fired ceramics. The olive-green glaze was made using a mixture of clay and wood ash. The colour resulted from minor impurities in the clay. Glazed stoneware, with incised and combed decoration Museum no. C.138-1913 [September 2009]
last_checked
2014-08-30T02:19:49.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-30T02:19:49.000Z
latitude
29.19083
location
World Ceramics, room 145, case 45
longitude
120.083656
marks
materials
stoneware
materials_techniques
Stoneware, glazed
museum_number
C.138-1913
museum_number_token
c1381913
object_number
O127896
object_type
Jar
on_display
1
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
Made of high-fired stoneware, and with an olive-green glaze, this jar is a precursor of the celebrated celadon wares of the Song and later dynasties. It was made in Zhejiang province, which lies south of the Nanshan-Qingling divide. Vital for an understanding of Chinese ceramics, this takes its name from two mountain ranges separating the loess plateau of north China from rice-growing southern China. Provinces north of this line are classified as 'northern China', have different raw materials from those in the south and their wares were fired in kilns of different design. Archaeological evidence indicates that the first Chinese ceramics were produced in southern China, in about 9000 BC, at least 1,000 years before the earliest than northern wares. Southern potters used superficial deposits of locally abundant refractory clays. These are by definition resistant to heat and therefore needed a high temperature to mature, and in about 1500 BC true vitrified stoneware - fired at 1,150-1,200°C - made its first appearance in Zhejiang. The first Chinese glazes were discovered by chance, when incandescent wood ash in the draught of a high-temperature kiln reacted with the clays of the wares. Potters were quick to make use of this natural reaction by deliberately applying wood ash to the raw clay, and, as on the later celadons, here they exploit the deepening of the colour where the glaze pools. The three ridges on the shoulders prevented the molten glaze from running at full heat, but have the added advantage of evoking work in cast bronze.
place
Zhejiang
primary_image_id
2007BM1623
production_note
production_type
public_access_description
Made of high-fired stoneware, and with an olive-green glaze, this jar is a precursor of the celebrated celadon wares of the Song and later dynasties. It was made in Zhejiang province, which lies south of the Nanshan-Qingling divide. Vital for an understanding of Chinese ceramics, this takes its name from two mountain ranges separating the loess plateau of north China from rice-growing southern China. Provinces north of this line are classified as 'northern China', have different raw materials from those in the south and their wares were fired in kilns of different design. Archaeological evidence indicates that the first Chinese ceramics were produced in southern China, in about 9000 BC, at least 1,000 years before the earliest than northern wares. Southern potters used superficial deposits of locally abundant refractory clays. These are by definition resistant to heat and therefore needed a high temperature to mature, and in about 1500 BC true vitrified stoneware - fired at 1,150-1,200°C - made its first appearance in Zhejiang. The first Chinese glazes were discovered by chance, when incandescent wood ash in the draught of a high-temperature kiln reacted with the clays of the wares. Potters were quick to make use of this natural reaction by deliberately applying wood ash to the raw clay, and, as on the later celadons, here they exploit the deepening of the colour where the glaze pools. The three ridges on the shoulders prevented the molten glaze from running at full heat, but have the added advantage of evoking work in cast bronze.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
VA
slug
jar
sys_updated
2013-08-17T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
glazed
title
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
8
year_start
-206