No Title

2006am8598 jpg l

View the V&A API .json response

Acquired in 1945 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Unknown
attributions_note
bibliography
collection_code
FWK
credit
Bequeathed by Mr Edward Knoblock
date_end
1808-12-31
date_start
1799-01-01
date_text
ca. 1804 (made)
descriptive_line
dimensions
Height: 91 cm, Width: 65 cm, Depth: 74 cm
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
gallery
British Galleries, room 120
historical_context_note
historical_significance
history_note
George Smith (active 1801-1828) illustrated a design for a very similar armchair in his pattern book, A Collection of Designs for Household Furniture and Interior Decoration, 1808, plate 56, dated 1 December 1804. The Museum's armchair may have been part of a set, possibly made for the collector Philip John Miles, for whom the architect Thomas Hopper built Leigh Court, Somerset, in 1814. The set subsequently became part of the collection of his son, John William Miles, at Forde Abbey, Dorset, and was illustrated there in the Tapestry Room in an article, 'Forde Abbey - II', Country Life, 10 July 1909, pp.55-56. Four armchairs presumably from the Forde Abbey set are now in the Royal Pavilion, Brighton. Another armchair of the same design was sold at Sothebys, London, 30th November 2001, lot 101.
id
9729
label
British Galleries: This chair is based on designs published in George Smith's 'Collection of Designs for Household Furniture and Interior Decoration' of 1808. Smith's designs blended Greek, Roman and Egyptian forms and motifs to produce a standardised version of the Regency Classical style. His book introduced this style to a far wider audience. [27/03/2003]
last_checked
2014-08-29T19:52:24.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-29T19:52:24.000Z
latitude
54.313919
location
British Galleries, room 120, case 20
longitude
-2.23218
marks
VI' punched inside the back seat rail
materials
materials_techniques
Beech, painted and gilded, with cane seat
museum_number
W.14-1945
museum_number_token
w141945
object_number
O78951
object_type
Armchair
on_display
1
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
place
Great Britain
primary_image_id
2006AM8598
production_note
After a design by George Smith
production_type
public_access_description
Object Type Armchairs of this nature were intended for the drawing room. In his Collection of Designs for Household Furniture and Interior Decoration (1808) George Smith praised their 'great taste', 'elegance' and 'costly materials'. People This chair comes from a set of ten that were probably made for Leigh Court near Bristol, a house designed by Thomas Hopper (1776-1856) in the ancient Greek Ionic style. Materials & Making The frame of the armchair is made of painted, gilded and carved beech, and its seat of cane. The loose cushion is covered in a modern silk damask, the design based on fashionable textiles of about 1805. Time Smith's Collection of Designs for Household Furniture and Interior Decoration (1808) borrowed ideas from the illustrations of Household Furniture and Interior Decoration by Thomas Hope (1769-1831), published a year earlier. This thus helped to popularise Hope's designs among cabinet-makers and their clients.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
VA
slug
armchair-unknown
sys_updated
2014-08-04T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
title
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
1808
year_start
1799