No Title

2006ah0321 jpg l

View the V&A API .json response

Acquired in 1958 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Lockett, Joseph
attributions_note
bibliography
collection_code
T&F
credit
Given by the Henry Francis du Pont Winterthur Museum
date_end
1820-12-31
date_start
1816-01-01
date_text
1816-1820 (made)
descriptive_line
dimensions
Length: 180.5 cm, Width: 66 cm
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
gallery
British Galleries, room 120
historical_context_note
historical_significance
history_note
Printed by Joseph Lockett for George Palfreyman, Manchester
id
9701
label
British Galleries: Britannia riding in her chariot with her shield and trident is one of the main features on this printed furnishing fabric. For British consumers it seemed natural and proper that Britannia should take her place alongside classical goddesses such as Minerva, Roman goddess of Wisdom, who occupies the other chariot. [27/03/2003]
last_checked
2014-08-29T19:52:15.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-29T19:52:15.000Z
latitude
53.479622
location
British Galleries, room 120, case 11
longitude
-2.24881
marks
materials
materials_techniques
Roller-printed cotton
museum_number
T.76-1958
museum_number_token
t761958
object_number
O78917
object_type
Furnishing fabric
on_display
1
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
place
Manchester
primary_image_id
2006AH0321
production_note
production_type
public_access_description
Object Type The pattern of this printed cotton was made by means of an engraved metal roller. Roller-printing on textiles had been introduced in the late 18th century,and at first it was used mainly for small-patterned dress fabrics. By the time this cotton was printed in about 1816 the technique had been developed for much larger-scale designs, and by the 1830s roller-printing had largely replaced block-printing in the production of fashionable furnishing fabrics. People Many of the engravers of metal roller-plates were skilled draughtsmen. This design was engraved by a Mr Sutherland from the firm of Joseph Lockett. Lockett himself was one of the finest engravers working in the English industry in the first half of the 19th century. Place Most of the leading printworks in the London area had closed down by the beginning of the 19th century, and the centre of the textile printing industry had shifted to Lancashire, where this cotton was printed, and to Carlisle in Cumbria.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
VA
slug
furnishing-fabric-lockett-joseph
sys_updated
2013-08-17T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
title
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
1820
year_start
1816