No Title

2006am7024 jpg l

View the V&A API .json response

Acquired in 1975 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Henry, H. H.
attributions_note
bibliography
collection_code
T&F
credit
date_end
1829-12-31
date_start
1820-01-01
date_text
1820s (made)
descriptive_line
Sample of a design for painted velvet, made by H.H. Henry, Great Britain, 1820s.
dimensions
Height: 34.29 cm, Width: 28.26 cm
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
gallery
British Galleries, room 120
historical_context_note
historical_significance
history_note
Made in Britain by H.H. Henry
id
9559
label
British Galleries: PAINTING ON VELVET
The new technique of painting onto silk velvet provided amateur artists with a decorative effect that was quite different from the crispness and delicacy of painted taffeta and satin, which had been popular from the late 18th century. Once painted, pieces of velvet like the bag panel here, could be made up into decorative objects and accessories. [27/03/2003]
last_checked
2014-08-29T19:51:33.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-29T19:51:33.000Z
latitude
54.313919
location
British Galleries, room 120, case 15, shelf DR4
longitude
-2.23218
marks
At the bottom is the signiture 'H.H. Henry'
materials
materials_techniques
Watercolour on paper
museum_number
T.131-1975
museum_number_token
t1311975
object_number
O78742
object_type
Sample
on_display
true
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
Painted on paper with watercolour is a sample of design for painted velvet. The centre of the design shows a poppy, convolulus painted in details, a large purple flower and green leaf. The design stands in an oval of graded ivy leaves, crossed at the top.
place
Great Britain
primary_image_id
2006AM7024
production_note
production_type
public_access_description
Object Type The practice of painting designs onto silk velvet was an outlet for the amateur artist, to create panels that she could then make into decorative objects with her needle. She might compose the design herself, or buy it, like this one. The effect of the paint colours on the pile of the velvet gave the pattern a density and texture quite different from the crispness and delicacy of painted taffeta and satin, popular from the later 18th century. People This watercolour design came to the V&A in a collection of designs and examples of painted velvet, with a trade card inscribed 'Mr. Henry, Artist. Miniature Profile. Velvet. Ornament Painter'. The design is signed 'H.H. Henry', but nothing further is known about him. His designs can be compared to those illustrated by Nathaniel Whittock in The Art of Drawing and Colouring from Nature; Flowers, Fruit, and Shells: To Which is Added, Correct Directions for Preparing the Most Brilliant Colours for Painting on Velvet, with the Mode of UsingThem: Also the New Method of Oriental Tinting, published in London in 1829.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
VA
slug
sample-henry-h-h
sys_updated
2013-08-17T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
title
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
1829
year_start
1820