No Title

2007bl8757 jpg l

View the V&A API .json response

Acquired in 1871 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Unknown
attributions_note
bibliography
collection_code
MET
credit
date_end
date_start
date_text
1500 BC-1400 BC (made)
descriptive_line
Gold ring with a revolving oval bezel set with a glazed steatite scarab with amuletic signs. The shoulders bound with wire, Egypt, Second Intermediate Period, about 1500-1400 BC.
dimensions
Height: 2.5 cm, Width: 2.7 cm, Depth: 1.3 cm
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
gallery
Jewellery, room 91
historical_context_note
historical_significance
history_note
ex Waterton Collection
id
95055
label
last_checked
2014-08-30T01:54:18.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-30T01:54:18.000Z
latitude
26.69636
location
Jewellery, room 91, case 4, shelf A, box 1
longitude
30.246469
marks
materials
gold, steatite
materials_techniques
Gold set with glazed steatite and bound with wire
museum_number
407-1871
museum_number_token
4071871
object_number
O122544
object_type
Ring
on_display
true
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
Gold ring with a revolving oval bezel set with a glazed steatite scarab with amuletic signs. The shoulders bound with wire.
place
Egypt
primary_image_id
2007BL8757
production_note
production_type
public_access_description
The earliest known finger rings are about 6000 years old and come from the near East. They evolved from a cylinder seal attached to a hoop of precious metal surrounding the finger. Later the Egyptians used a magical scarab beetle, in stone or imitation stone, with an engraved seal on its base. This was adopted by the Etruscans and Phoenicians, and from it developed the signet ring as a guarantee of authenticity or ownership. The scarab beetle was thought to be an incarnation of Khepri, an Egyptian sun god associated with resurrection. Because the beetle lays its eggs in a ball of dung and pushes it around, the Egyptians used it as an image and metaphor for the passage of the sun across the sky. The young scarab beetles hatch out of the ball of dung (equivalent to the sun), which emphasizes the concept of new life and rebirth through the sun. This steatite beetle is glazed in blue, colour associated with rebirth. On the underside it is marked with amuletic signs, which suggests that it wasn't intended to be used as a seal.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
VA
slug
ring-unknown
sys_updated
2013-08-17T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
title
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
-1400
year_start
-1500