Aureus of Trajan

2006ay3115 jpg l

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Acquired in 1910 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Unknown
attributions_note
bibliography
Cohen, Henry. Description Historique des Monnaies frappées sous l'Empire Romain communément appellées, médailles impériales, par Henry Cohen. Paris, 1859-68. No. 576. Mattingly, Harold, and Sydenham, Edward Allen. The Roman Imperial Coinage. Vol. 2: Vespasian to Hadrian. London: Spink, 1926. No. 294 Mattingly, Harold. Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum. Vol. 3: Nerva to Hadrian. London: British Museum, 1936. No. 456 Christol, Michel, and Lassalle, Christiane. Monnaies d'or de l'empire Romain aux musées de Nimes. Nimes 1988. No. 52. 'Salting Bequest (A. 70 to A. 1029-1910) / Murray Bequest (A. 1030 to A. 1096-1910)'. In: List of Works of Art Acquired by the Victoria and Albert Museum (Department of Architecture and Sculpture). London: Printed under the Authority of his Majesty's Stationery Office, by Eyre and Spottiswoode, Limited, East Harding Street, EC, p. 112
collection_code
SCP
credit
Bequeathed by Mr George Salting
date_end
0114-12-31
date_start
0112-01-01
date_text
112-114 AD (made)
descriptive_line
Coin, aureus of Trajan, gold, head of Trajan, Roman, ca. 112-114 AD
dimensions
Diameter: 2.0 cm, Weight: 7.18 g
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
At Home in Renaissance Italy (Victoria & Albert Museum 05/10/2006-07/01/2007)
gallery
Medieval and Renaissance, room 64
historical_context_note
The aureus was the standard gold coin of the Roman empire from the 1st century BC until the 4th century AD, and was issued throughout that period.The use of the portrait is the most persistent and usually the most striking feature of coins of the Roman Empire.The tradition is still commonly seen today. Particularly during the first three centuries of the Empire's existence (27 BC-AD 284) images were made of historically recorded (and some unrecorded) people. Trajan was one the greatest of the Roman emperors. He waged successful wars against the Germans and the Parthians, and was rewarded with the title Optimus, 'the Best'. His memory was greatly honoured, and he was given the unusual right of burial within the city limits of Rome. His ashes were placed in the base of his great column, held in an urn made of gold. Theologians, such as Thomas Aquinas, discussed Trajan as an example of a virtuous pagan. In the Divine Comedy, Dante, following this legend, sees the spirit of Trajan in the Heaven of Jupiter with other historical and mythological persons noted for their justice. Dio Cassius reported that "he was devoted to boys and to wine".
historical_significance
history_note
id
95008
label
THREE COINS of Trajan 98-117 Ancient Roman coins were very popular with Renaissance collectors. By owning them, and copying aspects of them in their own commissions, patrons could acquire some of the glory of the classical world. Roman Gold (left) and brass (centre and right) Museum nos. A.680, 707, 708-1910 [2008]
last_checked
2014-08-30T01:54:05.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-30T01:54:05.000Z
latitude
41.903111
location
Medieval and Renaissance, room 64, case SS3
longitude
12.49576
marks
'IMP. TRAIANO. AVG. DAC. P. M. TR. P. COS. VI. P. P.' (IMP[ERATORI] TRAIANO AUG[USTO] DAC[ICO] P[ONTIFICI] M[AXIMO] TR[IBUNICIAE] P[OTESTATIS] CO[NSULO] VI [SEXTO] P[ATER] P[ATRIAE]) To the Emperor Trajan Augustus Dacicus [Conqueror of the Dacians], High Priest, Holder of Tribunician Power, in his sixth year as Consul, Father of the Country. Reverse: S. P. Q. R. OPTIMO PRINCIPI (S[ENATUS] P[OPULUS] Q[UE] R[OMANUS] OPTIMO PRINCIPI) The Roman Senate and people to the best leader.
materials
gold
materials_techniques
Gold
museum_number
A.680-1910
museum_number_token
a6801910
object_number
O122479
object_type
Coin
on_display
1
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
Gold coin. On the obverse is a head of Trajan with an inscription around the border. On the reverse is shown three standards, surmounted by (l-r) a vexillum (a banner carried by Roman troops), an eagle, and a hand.
place
Rome
primary_image_id
2006AY3115
production_note
production_type
public_access_description
The aureus was the standard gold coin of the Roman empire from the 1st century BC until the 4th century AD, and was issued throughout that period. The use of the portrait is the most persistent and usually the most striking feature of coins of the Roman Empire. Particularly during the first three centuries of the Empire's existence (27 BC-AD 284) images of historically recorded (and some unrecorded) people appear on the majority of coins. Trajan (Marcus Ulpius Nerva Traianus) was one the greatest of the Roman emperors. He was regarded as a just ruler and waged successful wars against the Germans and the Parthians, and was rewarded with the title Optimus, 'the Best'. Ancient Roman coins were very popular with Renaissance collectors. By owning them, and copying aspects of them in their own commissions, patrons could acquire some of the glory of the classical world.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
VA
slug
aureus-of-trajan-coin-unknown
sys_updated
2013-08-17T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
title
Aureus of Trajan
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
114
year_start
112