No Title

2007bl8751 jpg l

View the V&A API .json response

Acquired in 1863 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Unknown
attributions_note
bibliography
collection_code
MET
credit
date_end
date_start
date_text
350 BC-250 BC (made)
descriptive_line
Gold hoop with a revolving carnelian scarab, decorated on the reverse with an animal motif, the shoulders of the hoop bound with gold wire, Italy, Etruscan, about 350-250 BC.
dimensions
Height: 2.2 cm, Width: 2.2 cm, Depth: 0.6 cm
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
gallery
Jewellery, room 91
historical_context_note
historical_significance
history_note
ex Webb Collection
id
94990
label
last_checked
2014-08-30T01:54:01.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-30T01:54:01.000Z
latitude
42.502998
location
Jewellery, room 91, case 4, shelf A, box 8
longitude
12.57341
marks
materials
carnelian, gold, wire
materials_techniques
Chased gold with carnelian and gold wire
museum_number
8769-1863
museum_number_token
87691863
object_number
O122457
object_type
Ring
on_display
1
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
Gold hoop with a revolving cornelian scarab, decorated on the reverse with an animal motif, possibly an antelope. The shoulders of the hoop are bound with gold wire.
place
Italy
primary_image_id
2007BL8751
production_note
production_type
public_access_description
The earliest known finger rings are about 6000 years old and come from the near East. They evolved from a cylinder seal attached to a hoop of precious metal surrounding the finger. Later the Egyptians used a magical scarab beetle, in stone or imitation stone, with an engraved seal on its base. This was adopted by the Etruscans and Phoenicians, and from it developed the signet ring as a guarantee of authenticity or ownership. The scarab beetle was thought to be an incarnation of Khepri, an Egyptian sun god associated with resurrection. Because the beetle lays its eggs in a ball of dung and pushes it around, the Egyptians used it as an image and metaphor for the passage of the sun across the sky. The young scarab beetles hatch out of the ball of dung (equivalent to the sun), which emphasizes the concept of new life and rebirth through the sun.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
VA
slug
ring-unknown
sys_updated
2013-08-17T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
chasing
title
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
-250
year_start
-350