No Title

2007bl8773 jpg l

View the V&A API .json response

Acquired in 1871 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Unknown
attributions_note
bibliography
collection_code
MET
credit
date_end
0200-12-31
date_start
0100-01-01
date_text
100-200 (made)
descriptive_line
Gold ring, possibly for a child, the octagonal hoop widening into the bezel, to which is applied a phallus, Roman Empire, AD 100-200
dimensions
Height: 1.4 cm, Width: 1.2 cm, Depth: 0.8 cm
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
gallery
Jewellery, room 91
historical_context_note
historical_significance
history_note
ex Waterton Collection Historical significance: In the Roman period, wearing phallic symbol jewelry was supposed to ward off the evil eye and bring good luck Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/
id
94815
label
last_checked
2014-08-30T01:53:08.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-30T01:53:08.000Z
latitude
32.311141
location
Jewellery, room 91, case 4, shelf A, box 23
longitude
-83.309642
marks
materials
gold
materials_techniques
Engraved and applied gold
museum_number
465-1871
museum_number_token
4651871
object_number
O122231
object_type
Ring
on_display
1
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
Gold ring, possibly for a child, the octagonal hoop widening into the bezel, to which is applied a phallus
place
Roman Empire
primary_image_id
2007BL8773
production_note
Roman
production_type
public_access_description
This small gold ring belonged probably to a child. On its bezel, it bears a phallic ornament in relief. Phallic amulets were common in the Roman world and were primarily a symbol of fertility. At a deeper level however, phallus was regarded as giving powerful protection against the evil eye and had therefore an apotropaic function. Children, who were fragile and particularly at risk of diseases and death, wore amuletic jewellery bearing this symbol. Phallic pendants and rings are commonly found in child's tomb. They almost certainly represent an attempt to aid the child not only in life during illness but also on the journey through death. As such, phallic amulets were also popular amongst soldiers and bronze or bone amulets have been found on Roman military sites. The Roman god Priapus was a phallic deity who was commonly found depicted on houses in Pompei, as well as at crossroads. His role was to protect the occupants of the house from evil and ensure fertility. His role was firmly established by the first century BC.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
VA
slug
ring-unknown
sys_updated
2013-08-17T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
title
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
200
year_start
100