No Title

2007bl8780 jpg l

View the V&A API .json response

Acquired in 1962 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Unknown
attributions_note
bibliography
collection_code
MET
credit
Given by Dame Joan Evans
date_end
0200-12-31
date_start
0100-01-01
date_text
100-200 (made)
descriptive_line
Gold serpent ring, formed of two coils terminating in two chased snake heads, Roman Empire, 100-200 AD
dimensions
Height: 2.2 cm, Width: 2.3 cm, Depth: 2.9 cm
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
gallery
Jewellery, room 91
historical_context_note
historical_significance
history_note
ex Waterton Collection
id
94811
label
last_checked
2014-08-30T01:53:07.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-30T01:53:07.000Z
latitude
32.311141
location
Jewellery, room 91, case 4, shelf A, box 24
longitude
-83.309642
marks
materials
gold
materials_techniques
Chased gold
museum_number
M.135-1962
museum_number_token
m1351962
object_number
O122227
object_type
Ring
on_display
1
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
Gold serpent ring, formed of two coils terminating in two chased cobra heads.
place
Roman Empire
primary_image_id
2007BL8780
production_note
production_type
public_access_description
This ring takes the form of a spiral and ends in a snake's head. Roman jewellery borrowed heavily from Hellenistic goldwork. This particular type was common in Hellenistic times, especially in Egypt. Snakes were the symbol of a number of deities associated with healing, including the Egyptian goddess Isis and the Greek god of medicine Asclepios. It was therefore a commonly used pattern in jewellery, its spiral shape lending itself well to rings and necklaces. Worn as an amulet, the snake protected its wearer.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
VA
slug
ring-unknown
sys_updated
2013-08-17T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
title
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
200
year_start
100