No Title

2007bl8735 jpg l

View the V&A API .json response

Acquired in 1917 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Unknown
attributions_note
bibliography
collection_code
MET
credit
Given by Mr Harold Wallis from the Henry Wallis Collection
date_end
0200-12-31
date_start
0100-01-01
date_text
100-200 AD (made)
descriptive_line
Bronze signet ring, the hoop set with a comic mask, Roman Empire, 100-200 AD
dimensions
Height: 1.8 cm, Width: 1.7 cm, Depth: 0.7 cm
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
gallery
Jewellery, room 91
historical_context_note
historical_significance
history_note
id
94807
label
last_checked
2014-08-30T01:53:06.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-30T01:53:06.000Z
latitude
32.311141
location
Jewellery, room 91, case 4, shelf A, box 26
longitude
-83.309642
marks
materials
bronze
materials_techniques
Engraved bronze
museum_number
M.76-1917
museum_number_token
m761917
object_number
O122221
object_type
Signet ring
on_display
1
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
Bronze signet ring, the hoop set with a comic mask
place
Roman Empire
primary_image_id
2007BL8735
production_note
production_type
public_access_description
This bronze ring is set with a comic mask. Tragic and comic masks were used by Greek actors. By the fifth century BC, standard mask forms became common for specific roles, with the particular features of each reflecting the character of the figure being played. The mask usually has exaggerated facial features that compensated for the fact that the actor's own expressions could not be seen. These types of masks were commonly found in Greece and later in Rome as architectural ornaments, or as terracottas placed in tombs as offerings. In Rome, masks ornaments were found in the villas and gardens of wealthy Romans, where they probably evoked an atmosphere of Greek culture and proclaimed the sophistication of the owners. There are many known examples of rings with bezels in the shape of a mask or with a mask engraved or carved on it. Their meaning is not entirely clear today. They were probably not purely decorative or just evocative of the Greek culture. They could have belonged to an actor, or to a keen theatre goer. The owner could also have chosen a particular mask and character according to his own personality. They could also have been used to protect the wearer from the evil eye. The ugliness of the face and the wince had an apotropaic function. ALthough gold and silver were the most prized metals for jewellery, bronze - a copper and tin alloy - was also used as a cheaper alternative.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
VA
slug
signet-ring-unknown
sys_updated
2013-08-17T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
title
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
200
year_start
100