No Title

2008bt1996 jpg l

View the V&A API .json response

Acquired in 1920 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Unknown
attributions_note
bibliography
Jessup, R. Anglo-Saxon Jewellery (Shire Publications, 1974) pp 80-81 Oman, Charles, Catalogue of Rings in the Victoria and Albert Museum, London, 1930, no. 226, frontispiece.
collection_code
MET
credit
date_end
0900-12-31
date_start
0800-01-01
date_text
800-900 (made)
descriptive_line
Gold ring, with broad stirrup-shaped hoop, the shoulders ornamented with filigree and granulation in the form of dragon heads, the bezel a pellet of gold, Anglo Saxon, 800-900
dimensions
Height: 3.3 cm, Width: 2.6 cm, Depth: 0.7 cm
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
gallery
Medieval and Renaissance, room 8
historical_context_note
Other than having been found in the moat, this ring has no known connection to Meaux Abbey, which was founded in 1150 by William le Gros. There appears to have been no preceding settlement recorded on the site, which was in the flood plain of the River Hull, marshy land and prone to flooding. In the ninth-century the site was within the boundaries of the Anglo-Saxon kingdom of Northumbria. It was a turbulent period for the region, with Viking raids in the first half of the century, which included the sacking of Beverley Abbey. The second half of the century saw the settlement of Danish invaders. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle describes armies of 865 and 871 as "great" and says that they shared out the land in Northumbria. In contrast to the rich garnet-set jewellery of the earlier Anglo-Saxon period, finger rings are rarely adorned with precious stones. Gold finger rings have been found amongst the grave goods of both male and female adults in Scandanavian and Anglo-Saxon burials. The decoration on the ring is Anglo-Saxon with what Oman terms viking influence. R.Jessup suggests that the animal decoration should be compared with that on the Alfred jewel and Ethelswith's ring. Alfred and Ethelswith were royalty of the kingdom of Wessex, however Ethelswith's ring (in common with the present example) was found in the West Riding of Yorkshire rather than Wessex."Styles common in Wessex, especially near Winchester, have been found in the Danelaw, and a mould for making this sort of jewellery has been found at York" (Invisible Vikings British Archaeology Magazine April 2002).
historical_significance
history_note
Found in the moat at Meaux Abbey, near Beverley in the East Riding of Yorkshire in about 1867. Historical significance: According to Oman, this ring may have been made by less skillfull contemporary of the artist of the Alfred Jewel.
id
94691
label
last_checked
2014-08-30T01:52:40.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-30T01:52:40.000Z
latitude
52.883289
location
Medieval and Renaissance, room 8, case 13
longitude
-1.97685
marks
materials
gold
materials_techniques
Gold, granulation, filigree
museum_number
M.277-1920
museum_number_token
m2771920
object_number
O122080
object_type
Ring
on_display
1
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
Gold ring, with broad stirrup-shaped hoop, the shoulders ornamented with filigree and granulation in the form of dragon heads, the bezel a pellet of gold.
place
England
primary_image_id
2008BT1996
production_note
production_type
public_access_description
In contrast to the rich garnet-set jewellery of the earlier Anglo-Saxon period, finger rings of the ninth century are rarely adorned with precious stones. The skills of the goldsmith are seen in this example, where the different techniques of filigree and granulation are combined to produce an elaborately decorated ring.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
VA
slug
ring-unknown
sys_updated
2013-08-17T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
filigree, granulation
title
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
900
year_start
800