No Title

2006am3008 jpg l

View the V&A API .json response

Acquired in 1982 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Unknown
attributions_note
bibliography
collection_code
MET
credit
date_end
1808-12-31
date_start
1808-01-01
date_text
1808 (hallmarked)
descriptive_line
Knife
dimensions
Length: 26 cm
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
gallery
British Galleries, room 118a
historical_context_note
historical_significance
history_note
Made in London
id
9454
label
British Galleries: KNIFE AND FORK
By the beginning of the 19th century, the one-piece die-stamped fork with four tines (prongs) and a flattened handle had become standard. By this time also, most knife handles were made in silver or silver-plate, die-stamped in sheet form and then filled with resin. [27/03/2003]
last_checked
2014-08-29T19:51:03.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-29T19:51:03.000Z
latitude
51.506321
location
British Galleries, room 118a, case 5
longitude
-0.12714
marks
Engraved with the crest of the Ormonde family
materials
materials_techniques
Silver, with steel blade
museum_number
M.69R-1982
museum_number_token
m69r1982
object_number
O78631
object_type
Knife
on_display
1
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
place
London
primary_image_id
2006AM3008
production_note
production_type
public_access_description
Object Type Until the 17th century, it was the custom for guests to bring their personal cutlery, but by the 18th century knives and forks were provided in matching sets by the host. The basic form of knives and forks had also become standardised by this date. History & Use The steel blade of the knife has a 'tang' or rod at the base that fits into the hollow handle, which is then packed with resin. By the beginning of the 19th century, the rapid advances in mechanisation had led to a standardisation of shapes and designs of cutlery and flatware (spoons and forks). The die-stamped fluted, tubular handle is decorated with the 'Hourglass' pattern, a variant on the standard King's pattern, itself based on French 18th-century designs. The broad, straight, parallel-sided blade has a rounded tip, and this form was standard throughout the 19th century. Since ceramic or enamel handles were prone to damage, their use gradually declined, and silver handles came back into use.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
VA
slug
knife-unknown
sys_updated
2014-08-14T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
title
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
1808
year_start
1808