No Title

2006am2279 jpg l

View the V&A API .json response

Acquired in 1932 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Reily and Storer
attributions_note
bibliography
collection_code
MET
credit
Given by Sir Paul Makins, Bt
date_end
1851-12-31
date_start
1850-01-01
date_text
1850-1851 (made)
descriptive_line
dimensions
Height: 28.5 cm, Width: 28.5 cm, Diameter: 18 cm base
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
gallery
British Galleries, room 122c
historical_context_note
historical_significance
history_note
Made in London by Charles Reily & George Storer Acquisition RF: Sir Paul Makins Bart. Gift - Sir Paul Makins Bart. 66 Eaton Terrace, SW1 Glass liner missing. Reilly and Storer were in partnership from 1829 manufacturing good quality silver. The wine cooler was retailed by S.H. & D Gass ( 166 Regent Street ) who are known to have used Reilly and Storer to supply stock. Maker's mark of Charles Reilly and George Storer of Carey Lane. The vase presumably was once fitted with a liner. Neg._No: JX 2260 JX 2261
id
9442
label
British Galleries: MOULDED DECORATION
The Victorian demand for naturalistic ornament stimulated the use of elaborate moulds, which were used for ceramics as well as metalwork. This cooler is an example of elaborate casting using multiple moulds. [27/03/2003]
last_checked
2014-08-29T19:51:00.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-29T19:51:00.000Z
latitude
51.506321
location
British Galleries, room 122c, case 1
longitude
-0.12714
marks
Inscribed on base '166 Regent Street'
materials
materials_techniques
Silver, cast and chased
museum_number
M.62-1932
museum_number_token
m621932
object_number
O78619
object_type
Wine cooler
on_display
1
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
place
London
primary_image_id
2006AM2279
production_note
production_type
public_access_description
Object Type A wine cooler or ice pail for a single bottle was a French refinement for dining more informally in smaller numbers, introduced into Britain in the early 18th century. The cooler was filled with ice to chill the wine before serving. By the early 19th century these individual wine coolers were beginning to be left on the table as part of the dressing of very grand dinners. The manufacturers Elkington & Co. advertised silver wine coolers in their sales catalogue of 1869 for between œ15 and œ60, depending on the complexity of the decoration. This example would have had a glass liner. Design This wine cooler was designed in a style known as naturalism, which uses nature as the basis of the ornament. Love of nature was one of the most universal and respected sentiments in the 19th century. In addition to the revival of interest in historic styles, particularly the Rococo, with its playful use of natural forms, there was increased enthusiasm for employing nature as a decorative device on art objects. Naturalism was widespread and promoted as a good stylistic model by design reformers such as Henry Cole (1808-1882), the first Director of the V&A. Through the art schools under his control Cole emphasised the importance of appropriate decoration, which was secondary to an object's function. At its best naturalism could be strikingly original but in some cases the form and function were lost in decorative excess. Here the intertwined vines and hanging grapes signal the use of the vessel for cooling wine at the table.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
VA
slug
wine-cooler-reily-and-storer
sys_updated
2014-08-14T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
title
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
1851
year_start
1850