No Title

2006al3039 jpg l

View the V&A API .json response

Acquired in 1982 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Storr, Paul
attributions_note
bibliography
collection_code
MET
credit
date_end
1808-12-31
date_start
1808-01-01
date_text
1808 (made)
descriptive_line
sauce boat
dimensions
Height: 15.8 cm approx., Width: 19.1 cm approx.
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
gallery
British Galleries, room 118a
historical_context_note
historical_significance
history_note
Made in London by Paul Storr (born in London, 1771, died there in 1844)
id
9431
label
British Galleries: Sauce tureens evolved in France to serve the new rich sauces, some of them - like b‚chamel - named after 18th century courtiers. [27/03/2003]
last_checked
2014-08-29T19:50:57.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-29T19:50:57.000Z
latitude
51.506321
location
British Galleries, room 118a, case 5
longitude
-0.12714
marks
Engraved with the crest of the Ormonde family Hallmarked for 1808
materials
materials_techniques
Engraved silver
museum_number
M.57&B-1982
museum_number_token
m571982
object_number
O78607
object_type
Tureen and lid
on_display
1
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
One of a pair
place
London
primary_image_id
2006AL3039
production_note
production_type
public_access_description
Object Type Sauce boats and covered sauce tureens were among the new forms of tableware that were introduced into the English dinner service from the 1720s, influenced by the French structure of formal dining and a greater emphasis on soups, stews and sauces. At the French court chefs named dishes in honour of their distinguished patrons. Sauce boats and tureens generally had accompanying ladles and dishes. For the grandest and most elaborate of commissions, as here, they were made to match the rest of the dinner service. By the 1730s the form of sauce boats had developed to the single handle and wide pouring lip that is still used today. People Paul Storr (1771-1844) was one of the greatest of goldsmiths working in Regency London. He registered his mark as an independent goldsmith, but his career was inextricably linked with the firm of Rundell, Bridge and Rundell, who appointed him workshop manager in 1807, making him a partner in the firm soon after. Much of the firm's output between 1807 and 1819 is struck with Storr's mark. He worked in an assured Neo-classical manner that proved highly popular with the firm's royal and aristocratic clients.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
VA
slug
tureen-and-lid-storr-paul
sys_updated
2014-08-14T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
title
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
1808
year_start
1808