No Title

2006am3537 jpg l

View the V&A API .json response

Acquired in 1961 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Wakelin, Edward
attributions_note
bibliography
collection_code
MET
credit
date_end
1761-12-31
date_start
1760-01-01
date_text
1760-1761 (hallmarked)
descriptive_line
Silver cheese stand
dimensions
Height: 15.2 cm, Width: 35.6 cm
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
gallery
British Galleries, room 118a
historical_context_note
historical_significance
history_note
Made in London by Edward Wakelin (active from 1730, died 1784)
id
9374
label
British Galleries: When the Swedish botanist Per Kalm visited England in 1748 he noted: 'cheese nearly always concludes the meal. Commonly, there is set on the table, whole, a large and strong cheese'. Cheese stands in wood were the most common and examples in ceramic or silver are very rare. Only four similar silver cheese stands are known. [27/03/2003]
last_checked
2014-08-29T19:50:38.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-29T19:50:38.000Z
latitude
51.506321
location
British Galleries, room 118a, case 5
longitude
-0.12714
marks
Engraved with the arms and crest of Cecil, 9th Earl of Exeter
materials
materials_techniques
Pierced and engraved silver
museum_number
M.32-1961
museum_number_token
m321961
object_number
O78547
object_type
Cheese stand
on_display
1
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
place
London
primary_image_id
2006AM3537
production_note
production_type
public_access_description
Object Type This silver cheese stand or plate would have been used to serve a large, whole cheese on the dining table towards the end of the meal, before or in place of the dessert. The cradle shape held the circular cheese upright as it rested on its side. Commonly made in wood, cheese plates in silver are very rare. Only four similar plates are known. People This cheese plate was ordered by Brownlow Cecil, 9th Earl of Exeter (1725-1793), from the London goldsmiths Parker and Wakelin. Edward Wakelin (active from 1730, died 1784), who supplied the cheese plate, had supervised the workshop of the goldsmith George Wickes in Panton Street, London, since the 1740s. When Wickes and his partner retired, he continued the business in partnership with John Parker (active about 1730-1765). The plate may have been made in the firm's own workshop or by an outworker under Wakelin's direction. The cheese plate cost the Earl £37 7s 6d; the engraving of his coat of arms, crests and coronets was an extra 15 shillings.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
VA
slug
cheese-stand-wakelin-edward
sys_updated
2014-08-14T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
title
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
1761
year_start
1760