Lantern 2

View the V&A API .json response

Acquired in 2005 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Periton, Simon
attributions_note
bibliography
collection_code
PDP
credit
date_end
2003-12-31
date_start
2003-01-01
date_text
2003 (made)
descriptive_line
'Lantern 2', cut-paperwork image of a window in coloured mylar and matt black paper, Simon Periton, England, 2003.
dimensions
Height: 160 cm, Width: 152 cm
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
gallery
Prints & Drawings Study Room, level F
historical_context_note
historical_significance
history_note
id
92887
label
last_checked
2014-08-30T01:44:16.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-30T01:44:16.000Z
latitude
52.883289
location
Prints & Drawings Study Room, level F, case ON TOP OF BOOK SHELVES AT BACK OF LEVEL F
longitude
-1.97685
marks
'Simon Periton; 2003'
materials
materials_techniques
Cut paper and mylar
museum_number
E.596-2005
museum_number_token
e5962005
object_number
O119793
object_type
Cut-paperwork
on_display
1
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
Layers of matt black cut-paper and fluorescent orange, pale blue and green mylar giving the illusion of a 3-dimensional window frame with the words 'Think Of This A Window' incorporated in the centre where the glass would be.
place
England
primary_image_id
production_note
production_type
public_access_description
Cut paper is conventionally associated with the home-made, the cheap and amateur; it is usually small scale, domestic and decorative; it is often adopted to make intimate personal pieces such things as Valentines, or silhouette portraits; traditionally it has been a pastime for women and children, and the medium of such trivial ephemera as greetings cards and Christmas decorations. Simon Periton has re-invented cut paper work as a dramatic large-scale graphic medium. He tacitly acknowledges and sometimes exploits the antecedents and associations of the process, even as he subverts them. His cut paper pieces are large-scale, often wall-size or even installations. The works themselves explore sophisticated and often complex ideas, using pictorial means, and through the use of pattern, repetition and abstraction. He has described these works - which he refers to as 'doilies' - as having "fragile patterns" into which he can "entwine sex, death, religion, pop, current affairs, art history - anything". The process may be inherently simple and low-tech, but Periton achieves extraordinary effects, and much fine detail, and uses layering and colour to create pictorial effects, and also the illusion of volume and recession. In 'Lantern 2' Periton represents a feature of domestic architecture - specifically a bay window of the kind typical of British suburban architecture, in particular the commonplace Victorian housing stock. Here the window is represented ambiguously - the central panel could be panes of glass or breeze blocks. The lettering is blurred, crude - a graffiti-style text which echoes 19th century cut-paper work incorporating mottoes and aphorisms. Like Matisse, who made cut paper collages in his later life, Periton describes his cut paper works as drawings, saying "Any drawing I might do is done with a scalpel…A pencil line can always be erased but a knife cut has a certainty that appeals to me."
related_museum_numbers
rights
2
shape
site_code
VA
slug
lantern-2-cut-paperwork-periton-simon
sys_updated
2013-08-25T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
title
Lantern 2
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
2003
year_start
2003