No Title

2006am8131 jpg l

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Acquired in 1966 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Vulliamy & Son
attributions_note
bibliography
collection_code
MET
credit
date_end
1808-12-31
date_start
1807-01-01
date_text
1807-1808 (made)
descriptive_line
Clock with stand and keys, black marble with bronze dial and mounts, in the Egyptian style, made by Vulliamy & Son, London, 1807-1808
dimensions
[Clock] Height: 22.86 cm, Width: 30.48 cm [Stand for clock] Height: 4.75 cm, Width: 36.51 cm
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
gallery
British Galleries, room 120
historical_context_note
historical_significance
history_note
Made in London by the firm of Vulliamy & Son, 74 Pall Mall, London A plaque records that it was given in 1864 to Maria Theresa Villiers by Ernest Augustus II, King of Hanover, on the occasion of her marriage
id
9267
label
British Galleries: The design of the serpents and the Egyptian sun god Horus was based on engravings published by Baron Vivant Denon, published in 1802, in his 'Voyages dans la Basse et la Haute Egypte'. This was an account of the recent French archaeological investigations in Egypt. Manufacturers such as Vulliamy used these motifs to decorate a wide variety of popular goods. [27/03/2003]
last_checked
2014-08-29T19:50:08.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-29T19:50:08.000Z
latitude
51.506321
location
British Galleries, room 120, case 7
longitude
-0.12714
marks
[Clock] Signed on the movement ' VULLIAMY LONDON No.438'
materials
materials_techniques
Black marble, with dial and mounts of patinated and gilt bronze
museum_number
M.119:1 to 3-1966
museum_number_token
m1191966
object_number
O78431
object_type
Clock
on_display
1
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
place
London
primary_image_id
2006AM8131
production_note
production_type
public_access_description
Object Type This marble clock with mounts of patinated bronze and ormolu (gilt bronze) was made by Benjamin Vulliamy between December 1807 and February 1808 at the same time as two other clocks of similar design. The clock movement is signed 'VULLIAMY LONDON No 438'. The Vulliamy account book describes No. 438 as an Egyptian ornamented clock. Design & Manufacture The figures of Horus (an ancient Egytian god) and the serpents that decorate the base come from plates in Vivant Denon's Voyage dans la Basse et la Haute Egypte, published in London in 1802. The account book lists the craftsmen who worked on the clock and the amounts they were paid: a craftsman named Houle was paid £8 for 'chasing the Sphinxes' (modelling them with a hammer and steel tools); the movement was supplied by a craftsman named Jackson and only cost £5 10s. The clock was sold to Princess Mary on 5 June 1812 for 50 guineas. People Benjamin Lewis Vulliamy (1780-1854) produced a number of bronzes in the Egyptian taste. These included a set of vases (garniture) in marble and bronze made about 1810, which inspired copies and models in Britain, France, and the United States throughout the 19th century. Thomas Hope (1769-1831), who did much to introduce the Egyptian style to England in the Regency period, was among Vulliamy's clients.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
VA
slug
clock-vulliamy-son
sys_updated
2014-08-14T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
title
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
1808
year_start
1807