No Title

2006am0389 jpg l

View the V&A API .json response

Acquired in 1978 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Unknown
attributions_note
bibliography
collection_code
EAS
credit
date_end
1734-12-31
date_start
1725-01-01
date_text
ca. 1730 (made)
descriptive_line
dimensions
Height: 12 cm, Width: 16.5 cm, Depth: 10 cm
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
gallery
historical_context_note
historical_significance
history_note
Manufactured at the Jingdezhen kilns in Jiangxi Province, China
id
9243
label
British Galleries: This is an example of the armorial porcelain produced in China specially for European customers. The Mertins family probably commissioned an entire tea service from a specialist merchant. The merchant would have sent a coloured drawing of their coat of arms to China and the family would have waited many months or years for their porcelain. [27/03/2003]
last_checked
2014-08-29T19:50:01.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-29T19:50:01.000Z
latitude
29.292999
location
On loan
longitude
117.203308
marks
materials
materials_techniques
Porcelain, decorated in famille rose enamels
museum_number
FE.112&A-1978
museum_number_token
fe1121978
object_number
O78273
object_type
Teapot
on_display
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
place
Jingdezhen
primary_image_id
2006AM0389
production_note
production_type
public_access_description
This teapot is part of a service specially commissioned by the Mertins family. Plates from this service, painted with the same coat of arms and peony design, have survived, though they are not in the V&A's collection. The coat of arms shown on this teapot is that of John-Henry Mertins and his wife Bridget Peck. John-Henry was the son of Sir George Mertins, Sheriff of Essex from 1705 and Lord Mayor of London from 1725. Bridget was the eldest daughter of William Peck of Little Samford Hall, Essex. They married in 1717 and later lived at Valence House, Dagenham. In the 18th century it was fashionable to order complete tea sets or dinner services from China. Coats of arms were drawn in detail and taken to Canton (Guangzhou) by East India Company merchants. The Chinese merchants then had the porcelains manufactured at Jingdezhen. Despite the lengthy process, Chinese porcelain was still good value for money, and remained popular in Britain until British products came to dominate the market in about 1800.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
slug
teapot-unknown
sys_updated
2014-07-31T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
title
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
1734
year_start
1725