Aureus of Elagabalus

2008bu3689 jpg l

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Acquired in 1910 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Unknown
attributions_note
bibliography
'Salting Bequest (A. 70 to A. 1029-1910) / Murray Bequest (A. 1030 to A. 1096-1910)'. In: List of Works of Art Acquired by the Victoria and Albert Museum (Department of Architecture and Sculpture). London: Printed under the Authority of his Majesty's Stationery Office, by Eyre and Spottiswoode, Limited, East Harding Street, EC, p. 114
collection_code
SCP
credit
Bequeathed by Mr George Salting
date_end
0221-12-31
date_start
0221-01-01
date_text
221 AD (made)
descriptive_line
Coin (aureus), gold, of the Emperor Elagabalus (reigned 218-222) / the Syrian sun god El-Gabal (Baal), Roman, 221 AD
dimensions
Diameter: 2.15 cm, Weight: 6.35 g
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
gallery
Medieval and Renaissance, room 8
historical_context_note
Roman coins were used both as money and to spread the image of the Roman Emperor and his family and closest supporters. They are general not 'portraits' in the modern sense, but instead use facial and physical features to express the manner, and central tenor of the Emperor's rule - his style and interests as a ruler - a thinker like Marcus Aurelius was shown bearded and wise-looking, regardless of whether or not he did in actual fact wear a beard. Nonetheless, they should not be completely dismissed as records of Imperial likenesses, since the Emperors showed an interest in portraiture in the modern sense, and artists had produced naturalistic portraits since Alexander the Great's time, another man with a keen interest in spreading his image, one of youth, vigour and victory.
historical_significance
history_note
This coin shows the Roman Emperor Elagabalus, whose short reign lasted from 218-222 AD. On the reverse of the coin in the Sun God, holding a whip in his hand. Elagabalus in fact held the hereditary rank of high priest to the Syrian sun god El-Gabal (or Baal), and his mother was related to the Imperial dynasty. Behind the figure of El-Gabal in the sky is a blazing star, another potent symbol of Rome's eternal light and power, burning bright amid a sea of non-Roman neighbours, 'barbarians' and the like. Elagabalus was born Varius Avitus Bassianus in 203 or 204 at Emesa in Syria. Around 220 he unsuccessfully attempted to make El-Gabal the supreme god of the Roman state cult. From the Salting bequest.
id
92199
label
last_checked
2014-08-30T01:41:12.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-30T01:41:12.000Z
latitude
41.903111
location
Medieval and Renaissance, room 8, case 13
longitude
12.49576
marks
'IMP. ANTONINVS PIVS AVG.' 'PM TR P IIII COS II P P'
materials
gold
materials_techniques
Gold
museum_number
A.695-1910
museum_number_token
a6951910
object_number
O119150
object_type
Coin
on_display
1
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
Gold coin. On the obverse: Inscription. Head of Elagabalus to right, laureate, border of dots. Reverse: Inscritpion. The Sun God walking to left with right raised, and holding a whip in left. in the field a star.
place
Rome
primary_image_id
2008BU3689
production_note
production_type
public_access_description
This coin shows the Roman Emperor Elagabalus, whose short reign lasted from 218-222 AD. On the reverse of the coin in the Sun God, holding a whip in his hand. Elagabalus held the hereditary rank of high priest to the Syrian sun god El-Gabal (or Baal). Behind the figure of El-Gabal in the sky is a blazing star, a potent symbol of Rome's eternal light and power. Roman coins were used both as currency and as a means to spread the image of the Roman Emperor and his family and closest supporters across the empire.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
VA
slug
aureus-of-elagabalus-coin-unknown
sys_updated
2013-08-17T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
struck
title
Aureus of Elagabalus
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
221
year_start
221