No Title

2006al4015 jpg l

View the V&A API .json response

Acquired in 1924 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Unknown
attributions_note
bibliography
collection_code
EAS
credit
Given by Maj. E. R. Trevor Corbett
date_end
1750-12-31
date_start
1720-01-01
date_text
1720-1750 (made)
descriptive_line
Pap, China, painting and drawings. Two portions of wallpaper, which apparently were adjacent panels in a continuous series, depicting scenes of everyday life. Chinese, first half of 18th century.
dimensions
Height: 241.3 cm, Width: 83.9 cm
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
gallery
British Galleries, room 52d
historical_context_note
historical_significance
history_note
Made in Canton (now Guangzhou), China for export to Europe
id
9189
label
British Galleries: Chinese wallpapers with continuous scenes of daily life are rarer than those showing bird and plant life. This one is unusual, as the outlines are printed. Usually, Chinese wallpapers were entirely painted by hand, making them expensive in Europe. [27/03/2003]
last_checked
2014-08-29T19:49:45.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-29T19:49:45.000Z
latitude
23.107389
location
British Galleries, room 52d, case WE
longitude
113.267616
marks
These two panels were originally pasted to a screen
materials
materials_techniques
Paper, block-printed in black and painted in watercolour
museum_number
E.413-1924
museum_number_token
e4131924
object_number
O78213
object_type
Wallpaper
on_display
true
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
place
Guangzhou
primary_image_id
2006AL4015
production_note
production_type
public_access_description
Object Type This wallpaper panel is one of a pair. The panel was produced in China for export to Europe. The design, which stretches across this piece and its pair, is a park-like scene with Chinese figures and buildings. Trading Painted wallpaper panels of this type have few obvious antecendents in the native Chinese tradition of interior design. Their manufacture was the result of partnerships between Chinese and European commercial entrepreneurs. The widespread availability of Chinese goods in Britain, particularly from the early 18th century, signalled an episode of enormously profitable commerce for merchants of the East India Company as well as for successive Chinese emperors, whose officials closely supervised the trade. Some made vast fortunes through trading these and other such commodities. Materials & Making Papers like these were manufactured in the port city of Guangzhou (Canton), a major centre for the production of trade items. There are similarities in colour and design between different kinds of export commodity, and it seems likely that craftsmen who painted paper panels also turned their hand to painting silk, another European favourite. While most of these Chinese wallpapers were painted freehand, this particular panel had the outlines of the design block printed in black before being painted in watercolours. Ownership & Use Having first reached Europe in the 1690s, Chinese wallpapers were popular in Britain throughout the Georgian period. Entire Chinese palaces as well as individual Chinese rooms were constructed in Europe, papers like this playing a prominent part in their decoration. A complete set of panels, anything between 25 and 40 rolls, must have been difficult to put up because of the sequence that had to be observed. They were not pasted straight onto the walls but were mounted onto stretched canvas and nailed up. This allowed the owners of these expensive commodities to move and reuse them at will. High-impact wallpapers have remained a lively presence in interior design to this day. Historic pieces are being conserved and copied and used in new settings.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
VA
slug
wallpaper-unknown
sys_updated
2014-08-15T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
title
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
1750
year_start
1720