No Title

2006at5714 jpg l

View the V&A API .json response

Acquired in 1956 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Unknown
attributions_note
bibliography
collection_code
T&F
credit
Given by the Calico Printers' Association
date_end
1831-12-31
date_start
1831-01-01
date_text
1831 (made)
descriptive_line
Furnishing fabric of roller-printed cotton, England, 1831
dimensions
Height: 43.18 cm, Width: 58.42 cm, Width: 13 in
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
gallery
British Galleries, room 120
historical_context_note
historical_significance
history_note
Made in England
id
9037
label
British Galleries: Although the curving lines of this pattern and its use of naturalistic motifs such as leaves and fronds of seaweed were based on designs of the 1750s, the effect is very different. Developments in printing technology and, in particular, in dyes in the 19th century, created designs that were much more intensely decorated than any that would have been produced in the 18th century. [27/03/2003]
last_checked
2014-08-29T19:49:03.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-29T19:49:03.000Z
latitude
52.883289
location
British Galleries, room 120, case 18
longitude
-1.97685
marks
materials
materials_techniques
Roller-printed cotton
museum_number
CIRC.350-1956
museum_number_token
circ3501956
object_number
O78054
object_type
Furnishing fabric
on_display
1
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
Furnishing fabric of roller-printed cotton in green, red and pink. The pattern includes a design of acanthus scrolls with stars.
place
England
primary_image_id
2006AT5714
production_note
production_type
public_access_description
Object Type The pattern of this printed cotton has been created with an engraved metal roller. Roller printing on textiles was introduced in the late 18th century and at first used mainly for small-patterned dress fabrics. By the 1830s it had become a highly mechanised process, and had largely replaced block printing in the production of fashionable furnishings. Materials & Making The development of roller printing coincided with a radical transformation in the dyestuffs available for printing on cotton. Until the beginning of the 19th century printing had been based on the use of vegetable dyes. In Britain, France and Germany new chemical processes were developed and mineral colours produced that transformed the palette of colours available to the printer and made combinations such as the green and shades of pink seen here possible. Time The styles considered fashionable in 1830s furnishings were widely diverse. Among the more recognisable historical references were to the Rococo, Elizabethan and Gothic. A design such as this, however, seems to be aiming for success by novelty of effect, a taste encouraged by the developing technology of dyeing and printing.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
VA
slug
furnishing-fabric-unknown
sys_updated
2013-08-17T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
title
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
1831
year_start
1831