No Title

2006am6094 jpg l

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Acquired in 1925 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Chelsea Porcelain factory
attributions_note
bibliography
collection_code
CER
credit
Given by E. F. Broderip, Esq.
date_end
1759-12-31
date_start
1750-01-01
date_text
ca. 1755 (made)
descriptive_line
Tureen and cover in the form of a cauliflower in soft-paste porcelain and painted with enamels, Chelsea Porcelain factory, Chelsea, ca. 1755
dimensions
Height: 12 cm, Width: 12 cm
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
The Magic Eye (The Holburne Museum of Art 21/10/1989-10/12/1989)
gallery
British Galleries, room 118a
historical_context_note
historical_significance
history_note
id
8957
label
British Galleries: Covered dishes in the form of vegetables were probably made to serve dessert rather than savoury foods. Cauliflower tureens are mentioned in the Chelsea sale catalogue of 1755. [27/03/2003]
last_checked
2014-08-29T19:48:44.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-29T19:48:44.000Z
latitude
51.490139
location
British Galleries, room 118a, case 5
longitude
-0.16248
marks
An anchor
materials
soft-paste porcelain
materials_techniques
Soft-paste porcelain painted with enamels
museum_number
C.676&A-1925
museum_number_token
c6761925
object_number
O77970
object_type
Tureen and cover
on_display
1
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
Tureen and cover in the form of a cauliflower in soft-paste porcelain and painted with enamels. Represented with its larger leaves removed, and those remaining are lightly coloured green.
place
Chelsea
primary_image_id
2006AM6094
production_note
The glaze appears to be slightly tin-glazed, suggesting a date before 1756
production_type
public_access_description
Object Type The tureen was probably for serving stewed fruit or other sweet foodstuffs during the dessert course. A sale of Chelsea wares held in 1755 included six pairs of these tureens. Another of the following year included 33 pairs in both large and smaller sizes. Both had leaf-shaped underdishes, and in one instance the tureens were specified as being for the dessert. The dessert was the final stage of a grand dinner. During the 18th century it was the course on which the greatest effort and expense were lavished. Dessert wares of fine porcelain were costly and fragile, and they satisfied the same taste for artifice and luxury as the fruit and confectionery they were made to serve. Being hygienic and odour free, ceramics were favoured above silver and other metals for serving the dessert. Design & Designing Ceramic vessels naturalistically modelled and painted as vegetables and animals were very fashionable in mid-18th-century Europe. The fashion probably originated in France or Germany and was soon taken up in England, especially at the porcelain factories of Chelsea and Longton Hall, Staffordshire. The Meissen factory in Germany may have been the first to make such illusionistic serving vessels. The components of dessert services did not always match one another in mid-18th-century Britain.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
VA
slug
tureen-and-cover-chelsea-porcelain-factory
sys_updated
2014-07-31T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
Painted
title
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
1759
year_start
1750