No Title

2006am6056 jpg l

View the V&A API .json response

Acquired in 1935 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Chelsea Porcelain factory
attributions_note
bibliography
collection_code
CER
credit
Bequeathed by Herbert Allen
date_end
1759-12-31
date_start
1750-01-01
date_text
ca. 1755 (made)
descriptive_line
Tureen and cover in soft-paste porcelain and painted with enamels, and in the form of a partridge on its nest, Chelsea Porcelain factory, Chelsea, ca, 1755.
dimensions
Height: 9.5 cm, Width: 14 cm
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
gallery
British Galleries, room 118a
historical_context_note
historical_significance
history_note
id
8876
label
British Galleries: The fashion for tureens in the form of vegetables, animals or game birds originated in France or Germany around 1750. This tureen is based on a partridge, a game bird that had featured on British tables for centuries. [27/03/2003]
last_checked
2014-08-29T19:48:21.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-29T19:48:21.000Z
latitude
51.490139
location
British Galleries, room 118a, case 5
longitude
-0.16248
marks
materials
soft-paste porcelain, enamels
materials_techniques
Soft-paste porcelain and painted with enamels
museum_number
C.225&A-1935
museum_number_token
c2251935
object_number
O77889
object_type
Tureen
on_display
1
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
Tureen and cover in soft-paste porcelain and painted with enamels. In the form of a partridge on its nest. The nest is bordered with foliage and stalks.
place
Chelsea
primary_image_id
2006AM6056
production_note
production_type
public_access_description
Object Type These partridge tureens were probably for use in the dessert course of a grand meal, as some were specified as being 'for a dessert' when offered for sale at auction in 1755. They would have been for serving stewed fruit, cream or other sweet foodstuffs. They probably originally stood on leaf-shaped under-dishes, which protected the linen damask tablecloth (as this remained on the table during the dessert at the date that this tureen was made).The components of dessert services did not always match one another in mid-18th century Britain. Materials & Making These tureens were made in large quantities. They were painted individually, with the two halves paired up so that the pattern of feathers could continue from one half on to the other. The two halves were usually inscribed with numbers so that they could be correctly paired up after firing. The two halves of this one have different numbers, and the plumage patterns do not match, showing that they were not originally made for one another. Trading More than a hundred of these nesting partridge tureens were sold at an auction of Chelsea porcelain held in London in 1755.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
VA
slug
tureen-chelsea-porcelain-factory
sys_updated
2014-07-31T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
Painted
title
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
1759
year_start
1750