No Title

2006am9819 jpg l

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Acquired in 1940 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Bow Porcelain Factory
attributions_note
bibliography
collection_code
CER
credit
Bequeathed by Mr Arthur Hurst
date_end
1760-12-31
date_start
1751-01-01
date_text
ca. 1756 (made)
descriptive_line
dimensions
Diameter: 20 cm
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
gallery
British Galleries, room 53a
historical_context_note
historical_significance
history_note
Made at the Bow porcelain factory, London
id
8873
label
British Galleries: Transfer-printing was a method of decorating ceramics at a low cost per unit. It involved engraving a copper plate with a design that was then printed on to a sheet of gelatin or paper. This sheet was then applied to a ceramic item. On firing, the sheet was burned away and the design fixed on the surface. [27/03/2003]
last_checked
2014-08-29T19:48:21.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-29T19:48:21.000Z
latitude
51.506321
location
British Galleries, room 53a, case 1
longitude
-0.12714
marks
materials
materials_techniques
Soft-paste porcelain, transfer-printed, with painted border
museum_number
C.216-1940
museum_number_token
c2161940
object_number
O77886
object_type
Plate
on_display
1
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
PLATE decorated with transfer-printing
place
London
primary_image_id
2006AM9819
production_note
production_type
public_access_description
Object Type The Bow factory made tea- and coffee wares with transfer-printed decoration, and the small size and use of transfer-printing here may indicate that this plate was made to accompany a tea or coffee service. If so, it would have been to serve cakes or bread and butter. Plates of bread and cakes can be seen set over slop basins in some 18th-century paintings of people drinking tea. The length of time between breakfast and dinner was extending during the second half of the 18th century, and a snack of bread and butter or cakes would have been a welcome addition to afternoon tea. Design & Designing The Bow factory's engraver either copied the subject on this plate from L'Amour, a print by the French engraver Charles-Nicolas Cochin the Younger (1715-1790), or from an English copy of Cochin's print. The engraver Robert Hancock (1731-1817) also copied the design for transfer-prints used at the Worcester porcelain factory after about 1759. Materials & Making Although the Bow factory concentrated on utilitarian pieces, it made comparatively few transfer-printed wares, possibly because the printed lines often blur and sink into the soft-lead glaze. The printing here is relatively crisp. Sets of 'printed teas' were mentioned in a factory document of 1756.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
VA
slug
plate-bow-porcelain-factory
sys_updated
2014-07-31T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
title
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
1760
year_start
1751