No Title

2006an0878 jpg l

View the V&A API .json response

Acquired in 1919 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Unknown
attributions_note
bibliography
collection_code
CER
credit
Bequeathed by Mr John George Joicey
date_end
date_start
date_text
ca. 390 BC (made)
descriptive_line
Classical vase known as a bell krater of red earthenware and painted with slip, Basilicata, ca. 390 BC.
dimensions
Height: 30.3 cm, Diameter: 34 cm
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
gallery
British Galleries, room 120
historical_context_note
historical_significance
history_note
From the collection of Thomas Hope. Made at Lucania, southern Italy
id
8860
label
British Galleries: This bell-shaped vase, a 'krater' in Greek, was originally used for mixing wine and water. Thomas Hope, like many other collectors, admired the shape of these vases and their painted decoration. This one shows laurel leaves around the rim, anthemion or honeysuckle blossoms below the handles and a Greek key pattern around the bottom. [27/03/2003]
last_checked
2014-08-29T19:48:17.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-29T19:48:17.000Z
latitude
40.516842
location
British Galleries, room 120, case 12
longitude
16.102051
marks
materials
earthenware, slip
materials_techniques
Earthenware painted with black slip and white and yellow pigments
museum_number
C.1776-1919
museum_number_token
c17761919
object_number
O77873
object_type
Bell krater
on_display
true
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
Classical vase known as a bell krater of red earthenware. With figures and ornament reserved in red on a ground of black pigment and partly painted with white and yellow pigments. Below the rim is a laurel wreath. Round the lower part of the body is a circuit of running meanders broken by crossed squares. Round the bases of the handles is a circuit of gadroons, and below each handle is a four-palmette with lateral spirals. On one side is a comic banquet. A naked bearded man reclines, flanked by two servants. On the other side are two draped youths facing one another.
place
Basilicata
primary_image_id
2006AN0878
production_note
production_type
public_access_description
Object Type The krater was an ancient Greek vase with two handles that was used to mix wine and water. People The vase was once owned by Thomas Hope (1769-1831), the collector, connoisseur, patron and designer, who published a number of influential books of designs. The most important of these publications was Household Furniture and Interior Decoration... (1807), illustrating objects he had designed for his London house at Duchess Street. In 1801 Hope purchased the second collection of ancient vases formed by Sir William Hamilton, formerly the British Ambassador to the Naples court. These formed the nucleus for Hope's own collection of vases, which he displayed at Duchess Street. Materials & Technique The vase is decorated in the 'red figure' technique in which the areas surrounding the figures are painted in a slip (mixture of clay and water), leaving the red pottery showing through. Careful control of the firing process allowed Greek potters to oxidise the body of the pot, turning it red, by keeping the kiln well ventilated. The kiln was then starved of oxygen and filled with carbon monoxide (by using wet fuel), causing the slip to turn black. The kiln was then again well ventilated. The fresh oxygen supply turned the pottery back to red. The firing was stopped before the slip turned red once again.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
VA
slug
bell-krater-unknown
sys_updated
2014-07-31T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
Painted
title
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
-386
year_start
-395