No Title

2006am2101 jpg l

View the V&A API .json response

Acquired in 1931 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Willems, Joseph
attributions_note
bibliography
collection_code
CER
credit
Given by W. A. J. Floersheim
date_end
1769-12-31
date_start
1758-01-01
date_text
1758-1769 (made)
descriptive_line
dimensions
Height: 14 cm approx., Width: 10 cm approx., Depth: 8 cm approx.
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
gallery
British Galleries, room 118a
historical_context_note
historical_significance
history_note
Probably modelled by Joseph Willems (born in Brussels, 1715, died in Tornai, Belgium, 1766); made at the Chelsea porcelain factory, London
id
8848
label
British Galleries: Following the example of the French, it became popular to arrange dinner tables in imitation of formal gardens. The theatrical effect was enhanced by porcelain table sculpture. Such figurines originated on the Continent as figures made of sugar paste. [27/03/2003]
last_checked
2014-08-29T19:48:14.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-29T19:48:14.000Z
latitude
51.490139
location
British Galleries, room 118a, case 5
longitude
-0.16248
marks
materials
materials_techniques
Soft-paste porcelain, painted in enamels and gilt
museum_number
C.156-1931
museum_number_token
c1561931
object_number
O77861
object_type
Figurine
on_display
1
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
Sweetmeat figurine (one of a pair)
place
Chelsea
primary_image_id
2006AM2101
production_note
production_type
public_access_description
Object Type The figure is one of a pair of male and female figures (C.166-1931) and represents a gardener. Both figures hold baskets for serving dry sweetmeats, such as sweets, chocolates, nuts, small biscuits, raisins or other dried fruit. They would have been set out on a dinner table during the dessert course of a meal. Porcelain figures were first made as table decorations for the dessert. Most were decorative, but others, such as these, carried shells or baskets and performed a useful function on the table. It was very fashionable in mid-18th-century Europe to decorate dessert tables with formal layouts of garden hedges and flowerbeds made in confectionery. Figures in the shape of gardeners would have been appropriate ornaments for such settings. Idealised representations of gardeners, shepherds and shepherdesses, often fashionably dressed, were very popular in this period. Trading The Chelsea factory aimed at the top end of the market. It sold its wares from the factory site, from factory-run warehouses in the West End of London, through London ceramic dealers, and at auctions held in London, Dublin in Ireland and probably elsewhere. These figures would have been bought only by the wealthy.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
VA
slug
figurine-willems-joseph
sys_updated
2014-07-31T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
title
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
1769
year_start
1758