No Title

2006am6891 jpg l

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Acquired in 1924 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Worcester porcelain factory
attributions_note
bibliography
collection_code
CER
credit
Given by E. F. Broderip, Esq.
date_end
1757-12-31
date_start
1748-01-01
date_text
ca. 1753 (made)
descriptive_line
Cream jug of soft-paste porcelain painted with enamels, Worcester porcelain factory, Worcester, ca. 1753.
dimensions
Height: 8.25 cm, Width: 9.57 cm approx., including spout and handle, Diameter: 5.4 cm
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
gallery
British Galleries, room 52b
historical_context_note
historical_significance
history_note
id
8833
label
British Galleries: The finely painted decoration on this jug in imitation of Chinese porcelain would have made it a fashionable accessory on any tea table. [27/03/2003]
last_checked
2014-08-29T19:48:09.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-29T19:48:09.000Z
latitude
52.191065
location
British Galleries, room 52b, case 2
longitude
-2.222274
marks
A fictitious Chinese character
materials
soft-paste porcelain
materials_techniques
Soft-paste porcelain painted with enamels
museum_number
C.1294-1924
museum_number_token
c12941924
object_number
O77845
object_type
Cream jug
on_display
1
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
Cream jug of soft-paste porcelain painted with enamels. With a fluted and scalloped edge and scroll handle. Painted with a figure, palisade, birds and plants.
place
Worcester
primary_image_id
2006AM6891
production_note
production_type
public_access_description
Object Type Black teas were more popular in Britain than green teas by the date that this jug was made. Like coffee, these fermented black teas were usually drunk with milk or cream and often sweetened with sugar. After-dinner and afternoon tea and coffee were generally served by the lady of the house in the drawing room in comfortably-off households. Trading By the mid-1750s, soon after this jug was made, most of Worcester's wares were sold through wholesale ceramics dealers in London. A price list of about 1755 from Worcester's 'China-Warehouse' in London lists 'Milk Jugs round and pressed' (which were of a different design to this one) at 8s and 12s per dozen wholesale, and 'Cream Ewers ribbed and panelled' at 9s per dozen. These would probably have been painted in underglaze blue. The one here would have been more expensive, for it is finely painted in enamels. Enamelling is more expensive and complicated than painting in underglaze blue, as it requires more work, more costly materials and additional firings. Materials & Making The Worcester porcelain factory's raw materials included soaprock, which resulted in a type of porcelain that was resistant to the thermal shock of boiling water. Worcester's recipe was therefore suitable for tea and coffee wares.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
VA
slug
cream-jug-worcester-porcelain-factory
sys_updated
2014-07-31T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
Painted
title
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
1757
year_start
1748