No Title

2006ab9525 jpg l

View the V&A API .json response

Acquired in 1892 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Unknown
attributions_note
bibliography
Nurhan Atasoy and Julian Raby, Iznik: The Pottery of Ottoman Turkey (London: Alexandria Press, 1989), fig.440.
collection_code
MES
credit
date_end
1579-12-31
date_start
1570-01-01
date_text
ca. 1575 (made)
descriptive_line
Dish with a lotus design, Turkey (probably Iznik), around 1575.
dimensions
Diameter: 29 cm, Height: 5.7 cm
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
gallery
Islamic Middle East, room 42
historical_context_note
historical_significance
history_note
id
87621
label
Dish with Lotus Turkey, probably Iznik About 1575 Fritware painted under the glaze Museum no. 1745-1892 [Jameel Gallery]
last_checked
2014-08-30T01:19:50.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-30T01:19:50.000Z
latitude
40.433498
location
Islamic Middle East, room 42, case WN4, shelf 2
longitude
29.73229
marks
materials
fritware
materials_techniques
Fritware, underglaze painted in cobalt blue, glazed
museum_number
1745-1892
museum_number_token
17451892
object_number
O113281
object_type
Dish
on_display
1
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
Dish with foliate rim. On a background filled with triple scroll motifs, a design of lotus-like flower in centre, growing on a stalk that also sprouts several smaller flowers. Blue on white ground.
place
Iznik
primary_image_id
2006AB9525
production_note
The triple-scroll motif was used for a short period and is believed to be similar to late 15th century Chinese curlicues.
production_type
public_access_description
The Ottoman court's patronage of Iznik ceramics was renewed during the construction of the Süleymaniye mosque in Istanbul in 1550-7. The first Iznik tiles were produced, and a bright red was added to the range of colours painted under the glaze. This was achieved with a slip made from a special clay. In the following decades, tiles of high quality were decorated in red, green and tones of blue on a white ground. Dishes, bottles and other vessels had similar decoration on white or coloured grounds. By the 1530s, small sprays of tulips and other recognisable flowers were a common motif, but from the 1550s these were replaced by compositions on a larger scale, such as this design with a large lotus flower.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
VA
slug
dish-unknown
sys_updated
2013-08-17T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
title
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
1579
year_start
1570