No Title

2006ac4017 jpg l

View the V&A API .json response

Acquired in 1920 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Unknown
attributions_note
bibliography
Johns, Catherine The Jewellery of Roman Britain : Celtic and classical traditions (London UCL Press, 1996) Details of Roman enamel techniques Hattat, Richard Brooches of Antiquity: A third selection from the author's collection (Oxford, England: Oxbow, 1987)
collection_code
MET
credit
date_end
0300-12-31
date_start
0100-01-01
date_text
2nd century-3rd century (made)
descriptive_line
Fastening, bronze decorated with champlevé enamel, Great Britain (Romano-British), 2nd-4th century.
dimensions
Height: 5.2 cm, Width: 2.6 cm, Depth: 0.8 cm
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
gallery
historical_context_note
Some types of Roman-British jewellery, such as the present example were functional as well as decorative and were designed to secure clothing. Jewellery was worn for adornment, to display wealth and awareness of fashion. It may also have been worn as protection against bad luck. Designs which seem to the modern viewer to be purely decorative, were carefully chosen for their protective power. Both Graeco-Roman and native traditions influenced Romano-British jewellery. The moon shape (or lunula) seen here as the pendant to the fastening, was very popular in antique jewellery – enjoying a popularity that was not limited to a specific region but spread throughout the Roman world. It has been found adorning not only women and children, but also horses. To the ancient Egyptians it had represented Aoh the moon God who offered protection against the evil eye and witchery; it can be seen on mummy portraits and mummy costumes; later it became the emblem of the patricians of Rome and appears in Roman portraits. For Romano-British plate brooches in the form of a lunula see (Hattat cat nos.1146 & 1420). In a continuation and development of an established Iron Age Celtic tradition Roman jewellery and ornamental objects were often adorned using the champlevé enamel technique. To make this kind of embellishment, design shapes are scooped out of the metal ground and filled with powdered glass; then the object is fired, fusing the colours to the metal. A vase in the Metropolitan Museum of Art (museum no. 47.100.5) offers an impressive example of provincial Roman champlevé work.
historical_significance
history_note
Found at Hatherop, Gloucestershire.
id
86355
label
last_checked
2014-08-30T01:13:59.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-30T01:13:59.000Z
latitude
54.313919
location
In Storage
longitude
-2.23218
marks
materials
materials_techniques
Bronze, champlevé enamel
museum_number
M.16-1920
museum_number_token
m161920
object_number
O111766
object_type
Fastening
on_display
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
Fastening, bronze, decorated with champlevé enamel.
place
Great Britain
primary_image_id
2006AC4017
production_note
Found at Hatherop, Gloucestershire
production_type
public_access_description
Some types of Roman-British jewellery, such as this fastener were functional as well as decorative and were designed to secure clothing. Jewellery was worn for adornment, to display wealth and an awareness of fashion. It may also have been worn as protection against bad luck. Designs which seem to the modern viewer to be purely decorative, were carefully chosen for their protective power. Both Graeco-Roman and native traditions influenced Romano-British jewellery. The moon shape (or lunula) seen here as the pendant to the fastening, was very popular in antique jewellery – enjoying a popularity that was not limited to a specific region but spread throughout the Roman world. It has been found adorning not only women and children, but also horses. To the ancient Egyptians it had represented Aoh the moon God who offered protection against the evil eye and witchery; it can be seen on mummy portraits and mummy costumes; later it became the emblem of the patricians of Rome and appears in Roman portraits.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
slug
fastening-unknown
sys_updated
2013-08-17T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
title
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
300
year_start
100