No Title

2006ac4774 jpg l

View the V&A API .json response

Acquired in 1863 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Unknown
attributions_note
bibliography
Marshall, Frederick Henry. Catalogue of the Jewellery, Greek, Etruscan and Roman, in the Departments of Antiquities, British Museum. London: British Museum, 1911. Rudolph, Wolf. A Golden Legacy: Ancient Jewelry from the Burton Y. Berry Collection. Indiana: Indiana University Art Museum, 1995. Catalogue of the traveling exhibition organized by the Indiana University Art Museum, between 1994 and 1995. ISBN 0253209137. On Roman jewellery, see especially pp.219-223. King, Anthony and Martin Henig. The Roman West in the Third Century: contributions from archaeology and history. British Archaeological Reports, International Series, 109. Oxford: 1981. ISSN 01433067. Includes an article by Martin Henig on third-century Roman jewellery. Ogden, Jack. Jewellery of the Ancient World. London: Trefoil, 1982. ISBN 0862940087. Stout, Ann M. Jewelry as a Symbol of Status in the Roman Empire. In : Judith Lynn Sebesta and Larissa Bonfante, eds The World of Roman Costume. Wisconsin: University of Wisconsin Press, 1994. pp.77-100. ISBN 100299138542. Deppert-Lippitz, Barbara. Ancient Gold Jewelry at the Dallas Museum of Art.Dallas: Dallas Museum of Art, 1996. ISBN 0936227192. For Roman jewellery in particular, see pp.107-9. Smith, William, ed. A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology, 3 vols. London: John Murray, 1976. Vol. III, 'Tyche'. Grimal, Pierre. The Dictionary of Classical Mythology, transl. A. R. Maxwell-Hyslop. Oxford: Blackwell, 1986.
collection_code
MET
credit
date_end
0200-12-31
date_start
0001-01-01
date_text
1st century-2nd century CE (made)
descriptive_line
Figure of the goddess Fortuna or Tyche. Gold, Eastern Roman Empire, 1st or 2nd century CE
dimensions
Height: 2.1 cm, Width: 0.9 cm, Depth: 0.6 cm
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
gallery
historical_context_note
This small cast figure is identifiable as the Roman personification of Fortuna (or Tyche, in Greek culture) from the horn of plenty which she holds in one hand. Her other hand, now broken away, almost certainly held a rudder, symbolic of her role as the divinity who guided and conducted the affairs of the world. A complete figure of similar size, carrying a horn of plenty and a rudder, is in the British Museum's collections of Antique Jewellery, where it is identified as Roman and dated from between the 2nd century BCE and the end of the 4th century CE. (See Marshall, Catalogue of the Jewellery, no.3014 and plate LXIX.) The figure was probably one of a pair, each originally attached to an earring. Surviving examples of Ancient Greek jewellery include similar cast figures dangling from disc-shaped earrings (see for example the images in Wolf Rudolph, ed., A Golden Legacy, 28.B.1-2 (pp.132-3); I am grateful to Martin Henig for his suggestion, in correspondance, that this figure was originally attached to an earring). By the time this pendant was made, Rome had already been established as the dominant military and political force across the Mediterranean for two centuries. Some Greek goldsmiths had moved to Rome, but most jewellery that circulated in the Roman Empire continued to be made locally, in different regions. Greek motifs, therefore, continued to circulate. Although rings, bracelets, necklaces and brooches were worn by wealthy Romans, they were less inclined than their Greek predecessors to display their status by way of gold jewellery, as such ostentation went against contemporary notions of virtue and decorum.
historical_significance
history_note
This small gold pendant was identified as Greek when it was purchased by the Museum from the Webb Collection, along with other examples of Ancient Greek, Etruscan and Roman jewellery. Historical significance: This cast gold pendant, probably from an earring, shows the continuing influence of Greek (Hellenistic) jewellery types on Roman examples.
id
86342
label
last_checked
2014-08-30T01:13:56.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-30T01:13:56.000Z
latitude
32.311141
location
In Storage
longitude
-83.309642
marks
Unmarked
materials
gold
materials_techniques
Gold, cast
museum_number
8792-1863
museum_number_token
87921863
object_number
O111712
object_type
Figure
on_display
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
Figure of cast gold, with gold suspension loop on the back.
place
Roman Empire
primary_image_id
2006AC4774
production_note
production_type
public_access_description
This small gold figure of a woman carrying a horn of plenty represents Tyche (to the Ancient Greeks) or Fortuna (to the Ancient Romans), and is a personification of chance or luck. She probably held a rudder (symbolic of her role as the divinity who guided and conducted the affairs of the world) in her other hand, now missing. The figure was probably made in the Eastern Roman Empire, in the 1st or 2nd centuries of the Christian Era, and was probably one of a pair, each worn suspended from an earring. Its form and function recall Ancient Greek models. Although rings, bracelets, necklaces and brooches were worn by wealthy Romans, they were less inclined than their Greek predecessors to display their status by way of gold jewellery, as such ostentation went against contemporary notions of virtue and decorum.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
slug
figure-unknown
sys_updated
2013-08-17T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
casting
title
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
200
year_start
1