No Title

2006aj1887 jpg l

View the V&A API .json response

Acquired in 1884 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Unknown
attributions_note
bibliography
collection_code
MET
credit
date_end
0100-12-31
date_start
0001-01-01
date_text
1-100 (made)
descriptive_line
Snake armlet, probably Egypt (Roman Empire), AD 1-100, gold
dimensions
Height: 8.6 cm, Width: 6.7 cm, Depth: 6.3 cm
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
gallery
Jewellery, room 91
historical_context_note
historical_significance
history_note
Acquired from the Castellani collection
id
86334
label
last_checked
2014-08-30T01:13:54.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-30T01:13:54.000Z
latitude
26.69636
location
Jewellery, room 91, case 3, shelf A, box 6
longitude
30.246469
marks
materials
gold
materials_techniques
Gold
museum_number
631-1884
museum_number_token
6311884
object_number
O111701
object_type
Armlet
on_display
1
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
Snake armlet, gold
place
Egypt
primary_image_id
2006AJ1887
production_note
production_type
public_access_description
This type of bracelet takes the form of a spiral and ends in a snake's head. They were worn on the upper arm and are properly called armlets. Roman jewellery borrowed heavily from Hellenistic goldwork. This particular type was common in Hellenistic times, especially in Egypt where these particular armlets might have been made. Snakes were the symbol of a number of deities associated with healing, including the Egyptian goddess Isis and the Greek god of medicine Asclepios. It was therefore a commonly used pattern in jewellery, its spiral shape lending itself well to rings and necklaces. Worn as an amulet, the snake protected its wearer.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
VA
slug
armlet-unknown
sys_updated
2013-08-17T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
chasing
title
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
100
year_start
1