Dish

2006af8577 jpg l

View the V&A API .json response

Acquired in 1936 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Unknown
attributions_note
bibliography
Kerr, Rose. Song Dynasty Ceramics. London: V&A Publications, 2004. p. 34, no. 26.
collection_code
EAS
credit
Purchased with the assistance of The Art Fund, the Vallentin Bequest, Sir Percival David and the Universities China Committee
date_end
1234-12-31
date_start
1100-01-01
date_text
1100-1234 (made)
descriptive_line
Dish, stoneware with blue glaze and coper-red splashes, Jun ware, China, Northern Song-Jin dynasty, 12th-13th century
dimensions
Diameter: 18.8 cm
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
gallery
China, room 44
historical_context_note
historical_significance
history_note
id
84021
label
last_checked
2014-08-30T01:03:18.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-30T01:03:18.000Z
latitude
33.848209
location
China, room 44, case 41
longitude
113.447884
marks
materials
ceramic
materials_techniques
Stoneware, glazed
museum_number
C.845-1936
museum_number_token
c8451936
object_number
O108678
object_type
Dish
on_display
1
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
Jun ware dish with copper-red splash
place
Henan
primary_image_id
2006AF8577
production_note
production_type
public_access_description
The dish on the right of this image belongs to a type of ceramics known as Jun ware. Chinese ceramics are often categorized by the geographical area in which they were made, as the kilns of a particular region usually made only one or two types of ceramics at a given time in history. Jun ware was produced in the kilns of the Henan province and its height of production was during the Song dynasty (960-1279). It can be identified visually by its coarse stoneware body and its thickly applied glaze, which through firing gained an opalescent blue colour. At the edges the glaze ran thin, becoming semi-transparent and creating the simple and elegant colouring of this piece. While some Jun wares use only the blue glaze, it was also common to apply copper brushwork to dry glazes in broad strokes or washes, which then merged with the bluish Jun glazes at full heat. This resulted in the bold splashes of purple-red visible in this dish. Some types of Chinese ceramics were made exclusively for the imperial household. Jun wares, however, were mostly made for popular use and were not widely collected before the late Ming dynasty, when they were first mentioned in scholarly writings. By the Qing dynasty their status had elevated, when the Qianlong emperor (reigned 1736-95) was an admirer of them and used them for decorating his domestic spaces.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
VA
slug
dish-dish-unknown
sys_updated
2013-08-17T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
glazing
title
Dish
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
1234
year_start
1100