No Title

2006am7443 jpg l

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Acquired in 1905 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Moore, Bernard
attributions_note
bibliography
collection_code
CER
credit
date_end
1903-12-31
date_start
1903-01-01
date_text
1903 (dated)
descriptive_line
Vase, red flambé glaze, Bernard Moore, Longton, Staffordshire, 1903
dimensions
Height: 20.1 cm, Diameter: 16.5 cm approx.
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
gallery
British Galleries, room 125f
historical_context_note
historical_significance
history_note
Made by Bernard Moore (born in Stone, Staffordshire,1850, died in 1935), St Mary's Works, Longton. Purchase price note: 505 to 516-1905 purchased for £10.
id
8224
label
British Galleries: VASES
Just as in modern homes, dramatically different styles of ornament could be displayed together in Victorian houses. The style of the red 'art pottery' vase was strongly influenced by Chinese forms and glazes. It would have seemed startingly modern beside the delicate painting and gilding of the other, more commercially popular vases. [27/03/2003] Vase Designed by Bernard Moore , Wolfe Street pottery, Longton, Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire, England, 1903 Mark: ' Bernard Moore 1903', printed Porcelain with a high-temperature (flambe) glaze 506-1905 [23/05/2008]
last_checked
2014-08-29T19:45:46.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-29T19:45:46.000Z
latitude
52.989449
location
British Galleries, room 125f, case 1
longitude
-2.1343
marks
'Bernard Moore 1903'
materials
materials_techniques
Porcelain, with a high temperature flambé glaze
museum_number
506-1905
museum_number_token
5061905
object_number
O77641
object_type
Vase
on_display
1
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
place
Longton
primary_image_id
2006AM7443
production_note
St Mary's Works, Longton, Staffordshire
production_type
public_access_description
Object Type This vase is a purely decorative object which meets fashionable taste of around 1900, and would impress as evidence of the owner's knowledgeable and artistic taste. People After the closure of the family firm of Moore Bros. in 1905, Bernard Moore (1850-1935) set up his own kilns and decorating workshop at Wolfe Street, Stoke-on-Trent. Long before then he was a highly respected glaze chemist and a consultant to the ceramics industry on a wide variety of technical fronts. Throughout the 1880s and 1890s it is likely that he was experimenting with and perfecting the specialist and difficult glazes with which his name is now principally associated. Materials & Making Based on mineral (usually iron or copper) oxides, true flambé glazes (or transmutation glazes) are fired at high temperatures (up to 1500 ºC) in a kiln atmosphere that is rich in carbon monoxide, owing to the shutting off of oxygen at a critical moment. (This is known as a 'reducing' atmosphere.) This results in a violent reaction within the glaze, which is transmuted into an unpredictable range of reds, purples, blues, lilacs and greens. The glaze was perfected by the Chinese in the 18th century and first copied successfully in Europe in the later 19th century. A less demanding version offering a similar appearance could be achieved by using a slip oxide fired at a low temperature. Unlike the true flambé, however, this was easily scratched.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
VA
slug
vase-moore-bernard
sys_updated
2014-07-31T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
title
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
1903
year_start
1903