No Title

2006am5195 jpg l

View the V&A API .json response

Acquired in 1884 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Unknown
attributions_note
bibliography
collection_code
T&F
credit
date_end
1560-12-31
date_start
1530-01-01
date_text
1530-1560 (made)
descriptive_line
dimensions
Height: 10.9 cm, Width: 69.8 cm
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
gallery
British Galleries, room 58e
historical_context_note
historical_significance
history_note
id
8213
label
British Galleries: Imported bands of decoration were sewn into small, precious items of household linen, such as cupboard cloths, small towels or coverpanes (used to cover the individual place setting at table). Here, naturalistic motifs, leaves and plant stems have been simplified to make bold patterns. [27/03/2003]
last_checked
2014-08-29T19:45:44.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-29T19:45:44.000Z
latitude
42.502998
location
British Galleries, room 58e, case 1
longitude
12.57341
marks
materials
materials_techniques
Linen, with the pattern woven in silk double weave
museum_number
499-1884
museum_number_token
4991884
object_number
O77639
object_type
Woven band
on_display
1
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
place
Italy
primary_image_id
2006AM5195
production_note
production_type
public_access_description
Object Type Linens with woven or embroidered decoration were owned in large quantities by wealthy households. They ranged from large linen damask tablecloths to small covers.This strip of patterned linen would have been inserted into a plain or partially embroidered linen cloth to add colour and decoration. Ownership & Use Tudor inventories often listed extensive holdings of 'napery', the table linen used both in such splendid ceremonies as the Lord Mayor's feast but also in private homes. While many coverpanes listed in inventories include 'red silk needleworke', it is not known for certain that this little woven band was used in a coverpane. It is possible that this band was intended to be added to an embroidered cloth or indeed that such delicate weaving was sometimes itself mistaken for embroidery and listed as such in inventories. Materials & Making Although it is known that silkweaving on a very limited scale was taking place in England by this time, most fine woven materials such as patterned silks, velvets or linens had to be imported. Italy was the principal producer of woven silks and silk velvets and has traditionally thought to have also produced silk-patterned linens similar to this band. However, it is now known from documents that Spain, too, produced these in some quantities.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
VA
slug
woven-band-unknown
sys_updated
2013-08-17T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
title
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
1560
year_start
1530