Major Ainslie's bungalow

2013gl0927 jpg l

View the V&A API .json response

Acquired in 1963 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Ainslie, Henry Francis
attributions_note
bibliography
collection_code
SSEA
credit
date_end
1850-06-30
date_start
1850-06-01
date_text
June 1850 (made)
descriptive_line
dimensions
Width: 26.4 cm, Height: 17.7 cm
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
gallery
historical_context_note
historical_significance
history_note
id
81304
label
last_checked
2014-08-30T00:51:18.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-30T00:51:18.000Z
latitude
18.52671
location
In Storage
longitude
73.8616
marks
Deccan, India, my bungalow at Poorundur, the fort of the Vizier behind, | The Bungalow [I lived] in at Poorundhur [a hill fort in the] Deccan, & the Fort of the Vizier behind June 1850 HFA.
materials
materials_techniques
Pencil and watercolour, heightened with white
museum_number
IS.33-1963
museum_number_token
is331963
object_number
O105512
object_type
Painting
on_display
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
place
Pune
primary_image_id
2013GL0927
production_note
production_type
public_access_description
The amateur topographical artist Henry Francis Ainslie (1803-79) was born in Edinburgh, the son of General Sir George Robert Ainslie, Bt., who was a numismatist, an MP and former British ambassador to the Ottoman Empire at Constantinople, where he acquired a vast collection of antiquities, coins, and works of art. Henry Ainslie joined the British Army’s 83rd Regiment of Foot (later the Royal Ulster Rifles) in 1824. After serving in Ceylon, Canada and the British Isles, he sailed for Bombay with his regiment in February 1849, and between July and November the following year he was stationed in the Pune (Poona) district. This picture depicts his bungalow beside a tank, below Purandhar Hill Fort, Purandhar being the former capital of the Maratha kingdom. Ainslie's drawing style is distinguished by the use of earth colours, strongly outlined in black ink which rendered topographical features into bold simplified forms. While Ainslie’s army training would have included survey drawing, his watercolours, of which the V&A owns twenty-three, were probably painted for his own pleasure rather than as official surveys. From April 1853 Ainslie was on furlough in Europe, retiring on full pay as a lieutenant-colonel in 1855. He died at Westminster, London, on 29 March 1879.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
slug
major-ainslies-bungalow-painting-ainslie-henry-francis
sys_updated
2014-01-31T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
title
Major Ainslie's bungalow
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
1850
year_start
1850