No Title

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Acquired in 2004 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Unknown
attributions_note
bibliography
collection_code
MET
credit
Lent by the Museum of Methodism and John Wesley's House
date_end
1926-12-31
date_start
1926-01-01
date_text
1926 (made)
descriptive_line
dimensions
Height: 5.4 cm each cup, Diameter: 3.3 cm bowl of each cup [Stand for communion cups] Length: 35.6 cm, Width: 14 cm, Height: 14.5 cm top of handle
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
Nonconformity (Sacred Silver and Stained Glass Galleries, the Victoria and Albert Museum 22/11/2005-22/11/2005)
gallery
Sacred Silver & Stained Glass, room 83
historical_context_note
Nonconformity In England, Christians who chose not to conform to the doctrine, organisation or ceremony of the established church became known as Nonconformists or dissenters. To avoid persecution, many went to the new colonies in North America. In formal terms, Nonconformity began with the 1662 Act of Uniformity, which required priests to use the Book of Common Prayer and declare allegiance to Anglican bishops. Radical clergy and congregations refused to comply. Church leaders faced imprisonment, transportation or death. By 1700, there was greater tolerance so Nonconformism became more widespread. Its organisation differed from the Anglican church. Instead of bishops, Congregationalists were governed democratically by their members, whereas Presbyterians had elected elders. Methodism, which emerged in the 1730s, established authority in a conference of church members. Although Methodists accepted many Anglican teachings, some groups such as Baptists, Presbyterians and Independents pursued a very personal approach to religion, emphasising freedom of conscience. Practising Nonconformity In many Nonconformist churches, preaching the word of God took precedence over formal worship. Churches were centred around charismatic preachers like John Wesley, the founder of Methodism, or the Baptist leader Charles Spurgeon. However, dissenters did celebrate communion regularly. Some, like Congregationalists, took communion seated around a table. Others stood to receive it, or remained seated while church officials (deacons) distributed the bread and wine. Nonconformist communion plate was simple in design and often made from inexpensive materials, such as pewter, glass and ceramics. The earliest pieces date from the 1640s, and cups with two handles were a standard design.
historical_significance
history_note
id
79
label
Communion Set This set of cups with their stand was used in Nonconformist worship to serve the consecrated wine during communion. Individual communion cups were probably invented by the Reverend John Jowett, a Congregational minister in Birmingham between 1895 and 1909.With his enormous congregations of over 2000 people there were concerns about public health. Individual cups soon became fashionable throughout Nonconformist communities and they are still in use today. Methodist churches all over the world use disposable plastic cups. England, about 1926 Electroplated nickel silver with gilt interiors Lent by The Museum of Methodism and John Wesley's House [04/02/2011]
last_checked
2014-08-29T19:17:51.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-29T19:17:51.000Z
latitude
51.506321
location
Sacred Silver & Stained Glass, room 83, case 6C
longitude
-0.12714
marks
Engraved " PRESENTED BY ARTHUR W. CAPE 1926 "
materials
nickel, Silver
materials_techniques
Electroplated nickel silver, some cups gilt within
museum_number
LOAN:WESLEY'S CHAPEL.2:27-2004
museum_number_token
loanwesleyshouse22004
object_number
O108981
object_type
Communion set
on_display
true
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
place
London
primary_image_id
production_note
production_type
public_access_description
The invention of individual communion cups has been attributed to the Rev. Jowett, Congregational Minister of Carrs Lane Chapel, Birmingham from 1895-1909. Pressure from his enormous congregation of over two thousand people combined with concerns about public health prompted the innovation. Individual cups became fashionable throughout nonconformist communities and are still used today. Methodist churches all over the world use disposable plastic cups.
related_museum_numbers
rights
2
shape
site_code
VA
slug
communion-set-unknown
sys_updated
2013-08-16T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
title
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
1926
year_start
1926