No Title

2006am3192 jpg l

View the V&A API .json response

Acquired in 1901 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Unknown
attributions_note
bibliography
collection_code
EAS
credit
Given by Henry Willet
date_end
1715-12-31
date_start
1680-01-01
date_text
1680-1715 (made)
descriptive_line
Chinese mug
dimensions
Height: 9.6 cm, Width: 10 cm including handle, Diameter: 7.7 cm, Diameter: 6.1 cm mouth
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
gallery
British Galleries, room 56d
historical_context_note
historical_significance
history_note
Made in the Dehua kilns in Fujian Province, China
id
7860
label
British Galleries: CHINESE PORCELAIN AND EUROPEAN IMITATIONS
The whiteness of Chinese porcelain, became the ultimate goal of European potters and they tried many methods to imitate it. A coating of white clay slip tended to flake off an earthenware body, as did a white tin-glaze. High-fired stoneware, as in the German jug, was self-coloured but could be refined only to a light grey/white. John Dwight used Dorset clay and Isle of Wight sand for his expensive lathe-turned 'gorge' mugs, intended for strong ale. [27/03/2003]
last_checked
2014-08-29T19:44:29.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-29T19:44:29.000Z
latitude
25.4981
location
British Galleries, room 56d, case 13
longitude
118.235321
marks
materials
materials_techniques
Plain white porcelain, with moulded flower decoration
museum_number
3749-1901
museum_number_token
37491901
object_number
O77571
object_type
Mug
on_display
1
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
place
Dehua
primary_image_id
2006AM3192
production_note
production_type
public_access_description
Object Type The mug is European in shape and would have been used for coffee or chocolate. The Chinese factories made export goods to order, using European drawings, engravings, three-dimensional models or actual vessels as models. Place Chinese porcelain was exported to the West from several kilns in China. The most productive were those in the city of Jingdezhen in Jiangxi Province. However, some of the products most favoured by European consumers came from kilns at Dehua, in the south-eastern coastal province of Fujian. These kilns were close to major export ports such as Amoy (Xiamen) or Canton (Guangzhou). Materials & Making Dehua porcelain was creamy-white, hard and very translucent. It was known in Europe as 'Blanc de Chine' and was one of the first types of porcelain to be copied, in factories such as Meissen.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
VA
slug
mug-unknown
sys_updated
2014-07-31T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
title
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
1715
year_start
1680