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Acquired in 2004 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Bentley & Spens
attributions_note
bibliography
collection_code
T&F
credit
Given by Kawashima Textile Manufacturers Ltd.
date_end
2002-12-31
date_start
2002-01-01
date_text
2002 (made)
descriptive_line
Obi, designed in England by Bentley & Spens, made in Japan by Kawashima Textile Manufacturers, 2002.
dimensions
Length: 400 cm, Depth: 16.5 cm
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
gallery
historical_context_note
The modern kimono began to take shape in the Heian period (CE 794-1192). Since then the basic shape of both men's and women's kimono has remained essentially unchanged: a T-shaped, straight-lined robe that falls to the ankles, with a collar, and sleeves that fall to the wrist. The sleeves also fall from the wrist to approximately the waist if the arms are held straight out (though some styles have extremely long sleeves (see below); the sleeves of some kimono fall almost to the floor). The robe is wrapped around the body, always with the left side over the right, and secured by a wide belt (called an obi) which is tied in the back.
historical_significance
history_note
The obi is part of the Bentley & Spens Yukata Collection 2002 'Outgoing'
id
77184
label
last_checked
2014-08-30T00:35:49.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-30T00:35:49.000Z
latitude
52.883289
location
In Storage
longitude
-1.97685
marks
Bentley & Spens woven on reverse of obi
materials
metallic thread
materials_techniques
Machine woven black and metallic thread
museum_number
T.13-2004
museum_number_token
t132004
object_number
O100976
object_type
Obi
on_display
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
This obi is highly decorative, pairs of angels in lozenges are woven in gold metallic thread onto a black ground. The name of the designers, Bentley and Spens, is woven on the reverse.
place
England
primary_image_id
production_note
Reason For Production: Retail
production_type
Mass produced
public_access_description
In the latter half of the 1980s, the yukata, or summer kimono, began to make a comeback in Japan as casual summer wear amongst young women. Traditional versions were indigo and white, and whilst today there are no restrictions on the use of colour, the yukata has not witnessed any great variation in the basic design. The overwhelming majority employ some sort of traditional pattern such as a flower design or water pattern, with the odd ice cream cone or goldfish. In 2002, the British design team Bentley & Spens collaborated with Kawashima Textile Manufacturers Limited to produce a range of textiles for the Japanese market. The range of fabric designs created by Bentley & Spens has taken the traditional roots of the yukata and embodied it with a chic and playful image.
related_museum_numbers
rights
2
shape
site_code
slug
obi-bentley-spens
sys_updated
2013-08-27T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
Weaving
title
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
2002
year_start
2002