No Title

2006ak4492 jpg l

View the V&A API .json response

Acquired in 1891 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Unknown
attributions_note
bibliography
Turner, Eric An Introduction to Brass, London, HMSO, 1982 p.17 ill. ISBN 0112903762
collection_code
MET
credit
date_end
1700-12-31
date_start
1600-01-01
date_text
17th century (made)
descriptive_line
Copper-gilt puzzle cup decorated with a fish-skin pattern and an inscription around the rim, Hungarian, 17th century.
dimensions
Height: 2.75 in, Diameter: 3 in
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
gallery
Metalware, room 116
historical_context_note
The inscription alludes to the method of obtaining copper, by allowing deposits of it to form on pieces of iron, placed in a flow of a solution of copper sulphate from the mines of Herrengrund.
historical_significance
history_note
id
761
label
last_checked
2014-08-29T19:21:54.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-29T19:21:54.000Z
latitude
48.500301
location
Metalware, room 116, case 2
longitude
19.47434
marks
Ich stame her von Eissen, doch eines wassers macht, hat mich zu kupffer beissen in Herrengrunden schact
materials
copper gilt
materials_techniques
Copper gilt
museum_number
796-1891
museum_number_token
7961891
object_number
O67241
object_type
Cup
on_display
1
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
Decorated on the outside with a fish-skin pattern, and an inscription around the rim. In the centre of the cup is a pillar on which is a miner at work, surrounded by crystals of iron pyrites.
place
Neusohl
primary_image_id
2006AK4492
production_note
production_type
public_access_description
The inscription round the rim of this copper cup explains its history and original appeal. It alludes to the method of obtaining copper in the Herrengrund area of present-day Hungary. Because of the peculiar geological properties of the region, the local water had a high concentration of copper sulphate. Iron scraps were placed in hollows where the water collected and reacted with the copper sulphate to precipitate copper out of solution. The copper either settled as a sludge or formed a crust over the surface of the iron. This gave rise to the legend that the water had mysterious, if not magical, properties. Inscriptions on puzzle cups like this one read ‘Iron I was, copper I am…’ or ‘First Herrengrund’. Such cups were often adorned with small maquettes (models) representing miners at work. They were showpieces, and the persistence of the legend inscribed on the rims reflects the public ignorance of metallurgy. These puzzle cups were popular throughout Europe during the period 1500-1700. After this, popular knowledge of chemistry increased and this type of object inevitably became less attractive.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
VA
slug
cup-unknown
sys_updated
2014-08-14T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
title
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
1700
year_start
1600