No Title

2006ap4049 jpg l

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Acquired in 1938 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
attributions_note
bibliography
Liefkes, Reino and Hilary Young (eds.) Masterpieces of World Ceramics in the Victoria and Albert Museum. London: V&A Publishing, 2008, pp. 20-21.
collection_code
EAS
credit
date_end
date_start
date_text
ca. 2600 BC-2300 BC (made)
descriptive_line
Earthenware burial jar, coil built and decorated with unfired pigments, Gansu, Majiayao culture, Banshan phase, ca. 2600-2300 BC
dimensions
Height: 39.0 cm, Width: 39.0 cm
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
gallery
World Ceramics, room 145
historical_context_note
historical_significance
history_note
Bought from S. Segredakis, Paris
id
70255
label
Jar with spirals China, Gansu province 2600–2300 bc Large jars of this kind were used for storage and in burials. Examples have been found that contain food remains and children’s bones. The body was made from the fine, wind-blown soil called loess. The loess was formed into rolls of clay, which were coiled round and smoothed to build up the walls. This coiling technique was widespread before the invention of the potter’s wheel. Unglazed earthenware, painted and burnished after firing Museum no. C.286-1938 [September 2009]
last_checked
2014-08-30T00:02:26.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-30T00:02:26.000Z
latitude
37.668282
location
World Ceramics, room 145, case 45
longitude
102.975433
marks
materials
earthenware
materials_techniques
Earthenware decorated with unfired pigments
museum_number
C.286-1938
museum_number_token
c2861938
object_number
O73133
object_type
Jar
on_display
true
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
Earthenware jar with globular body, short neck and two grips at the sides, decorated with spiral patterns on the shoulder and hatched motif round the neck
place
Gansu
primary_image_id
2006AP4049
production_note
production_type
public_access_description
This large jar is of a type used for storage and in burials, as examples have been found containing remains of food and children's bones. Like many Neolithic pots from Gansu province in north-western China, the upper part is boldly painted with a dynamic spiral pattern - which probably originally had some ritual or symbolic meaning - and it is made from loess, deposits of which are found throughout the northern part of the country. True loess is a wind-borne dust, derived mainly from the mechanical weathering of igneous rocks (those formed from magma or lava). Loess deposits become increasing fine the further they are blown. Wares made from loess may be red, buff, grey or black, depending on the conditions in which they were fired, and are fine in texture. The jar was made by the coiling method, a basic forming technique found worldwide. This involved building up the vessel from the bottom with rolls of clay strips, pinching and smoothing them down, thus controlling the growth of the vessel's shape. After finishing by beating and scraping, and applying the handles, the jar would have been fired in a relatively sophisticated kiln, in which the fire was separated from and situated underneath the chamber containing the pots. An updraught system carried the heat of the fire up to a channel to bake the wares without damaging them. Temperatures of up to 1,020°C were already achieved at this early time. Finally the jar was painted in earth pigments and burnished, to smooth and seal the surface.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
VA
slug
jar
sys_updated
2014-07-31T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
painting, Unglazed, coiling
title
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
-2300
year_start
-2605