No Title

2006am6458 jpg l

View the V&A API .json response

Acquired in 1976 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Perrin, Geddes & Co
attributions_note
bibliography
Charles Truman, English Glassware to 1900 (1984) pl.25. Howard Coutts, 'London Cut Glass. The Work of John Blades and Messrs Jones', Antique Collecting, June 1987. Cherry & Richard Gray, 'The Prince's Glasses. Some WQarrington Cut Glass 1806-1811', Journal of the Glass Ass. Vol.2, 1987.
collection_code
CER
credit
date_end
1808-12-31
date_start
1806-01-01
date_text
1806-1808 (made)
descriptive_line
Wine glass with the arms of the Prince of Wales, England (Warrington), made by Perrin, Geddes & Co, 1806-1808
dimensions
Height: 12.3 cm
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
gallery
British Galleries, room 120
historical_context_note
historical_significance
history_note
Made by Perrin, Geddes & Co., Warrington, Lancashire
id
6755
label
From a service made for the Prince of Wales in 1806-8. British Galleries: This glass is part of the same set as the decanter. The set also included finger bowls for washing sticky fingers during meals. [27/03/2003]
last_checked
2014-08-29T19:40:46.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-29T19:40:46.000Z
latitude
53.393822
location
British Galleries, room 120, case 7
longitude
-2.58925
marks
Engraved with the Prince of Wales' crest and motto
materials
materials_techniques
Glass, cut and engraved with the cypher of the Prince of Wales
museum_number
C.57-1976
museum_number_token
c571976
object_number
O5302
object_type
Wine glass
on_display
1
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
place
Warrington
primary_image_id
2006AM6458
production_note
production_type
public_access_description
Object Type Drinking glasses with cut stems date back to the 1760s. Until the making of the Prince of Wales service, however, no glass cutter had dared to treat the foot, stem and bowl as separate elements. In this service, each has its own geometric or curving design. The impact made by this design is shown by the fact that it was reproduced in the mid-19th century and again reissued about 1900. People In 1806 the Prince of Wales made a grand visit to Liverpool. This visit effectively endorsed that wealthy city's association with the contentious slave trade. In gratitude to the Prince, the Council ordered a huge suite of table glass for him from the local manufacturer Perrin, Geddes & Co. of Warrington. When it arrived, the Prince thanked them for 'the most beautiful and ornamental specimens he ever saw of this valuable manufacture'. It seems probable that for such an extremely expensive service, which took over a year to make, other craftsmen may have been involved. The local glass-cutter John Unsworth, who styled himself 'Manufacturer to His Majesty and to His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales', may have been one. Ownership & Use Ceramics are the most portable of household possessions. Exactly where the Prince first used this service is not known. The remains - thirteen coolers, forty four decanters of two sizes, and seventy one glasses of three sizes - are now at Windsor Castle. This particular example, which somehow escaped from the Royal Collections, appears to correspond with the original order for claret or wine glasses.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
VA
slug
wine-glass-perrin-geddes-co
sys_updated
2014-07-31T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
title
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
1808
year_start
1806