No Title

2010ec2278 jpg l

View the V&A API .json response

Acquired in 1910 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Unknown
attributions_note
bibliography
Clunas, Craig, ed. Chinese exports art and design. London: Victoria and Albert Museum, 1987, figure 19.
collection_code
EAS
credit
Salting Bequest
date_end
1750-12-31
date_start
1735-01-01
date_text
ca. 1740-1750 (made)
descriptive_line
Dish, porcelain painted in overglaze enamels and gilt, China (Jingdezhen), Qing dynasty, Qianlong period, ca. 1740-1750
dimensions
Diameter: 38.7 cm
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
gallery
Ceramics Study Galleries, Asia & Europe, room 137
historical_context_note
historical_significance
history_note
id
66580
label
last_checked
2014-08-29T23:41:53.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-29T23:41:53.000Z
latitude
29.292999
location
Ceramics Study Galleries, Asia & Europe, room 137, case 13, shelf 4
longitude
117.203308
marks
materials
porcelain
materials_techniques
Porcelain, painted in overglaze enamels and gilt
museum_number
C.1391-1910
museum_number_token
c13911910
object_number
O69903
object_type
Dish
on_display
1
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
The dish is painted in coloured enamels with a basket of flowers and a border of carps swimming among water weeds. The soft pink is derived from gold and believed to have been introduced into China from Europe around 1720. Many of the other pigments are muted by the addition of the newly invented opaque white enamel. In the early 18th century the taste for Chinese blue and white porcelain was declining, and colourfully decorated ware became popular.
place
Jingdezhen
primary_image_id
2010EC2278
production_note
from label
production_type
public_access_description
The decoration of flowers and fish on this dish is painted in coloured enamels. The soft pink is derived from gold, and experts think that it was introduced into China from Europe around 1720. Many of the other pigments are muted by the addition of the newly invented opaque white enamel. The fashion in Europe for colourfully decorated ware began in the early 18th century, when Chinese blue and white porcelain was becoming less popular.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
VA
slug
dish-unknown
sys_updated
2014-07-31T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
Painted, glazed, gilt
title
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
1750
year_start
1735