No Title

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Acquired in 1910 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Unknown
attributions_note
bibliography
collection_code
EAS
credit
Salting Bequest
date_end
0008-12-31
date_start
date_text
206 BC-0008 AD (made) 1100-1500 (mounted)
descriptive_line
Bronze 'champion's vase' inlaid with gold and silver, China, Western Han dynasty (206 BC-8 AD) and Song-Ming, 1100-1500 ca.
dimensions
Height: 20 cm
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
China The Three Emperors (Royal Academy of Arts 01/11/2005-30/04/2006)
gallery
historical_context_note
historical_significance
history_note
id
62025
label
last_checked
2014-08-29T23:20:17.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-29T23:20:17.000Z
latitude
36.894451
location
In Storage
longitude
104.165649
marks
materials
Silver, bronze, gold
materials_techniques
Bronze, inlaid with gold and silver
museum_number
M.730-1910
museum_number_token
m7301910
object_number
O93007
object_type
Vase
on_display
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
Bronze 'champion's vase' inlaid with silver and gold, composed of several pieces soldered together: two cylinders placed side by side, two baserings, two upright zoomorphic figures alligned with the long join between the tubes, and one flat figure between the baserings.
place
China
primary_image_id
production_note
The two cylinders were originally made during the Western Han dynasty (206 BC-8 AD) and mounted at a later date, in the Song (960-1279) or early Ming (1368-1644) period.
production_type
public_access_description
From the Song dynasty (960-1279) the fashion of collecting and display works of art for their aesthetic value was very widespread among Chinese scholars, officers and wealthy men. The particular favour for archaic bronzes and jades encouraged the production of contemporary objects in an 'archaic' style. Fakes also made their appearance as a consequence of the growing demands in the art market. This bronze vase is a composite object made of several parts inlaid with gold and silver and soldered together. The two cylinders, probably chariot fittings, date to the Western Han dynasty (206 BC-AD 8), while the bases and the zoomorphic mount were added many centuries later, maybe between the Song and early Ming dynasties (1368-1644). A red and green patination, applied at the end, gave the surface a uniform 'archaic' appearance.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
slug
vase-unknown
sys_updated
2013-08-17T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
soldering, casting
title
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
8
year_start
-206