Harlemville V

View the V&A API .json response

Acquired in 2004 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Richardson, Clare
attributions_note
bibliography
Harlemville, Steidl-Mack 2003
collection_code
PDP
credit
Given by the photographer. Copyright Clare Richardson, courtesy of White Cube gallery
date_end
2000-12-31
date_start
2000-01-01
date_text
2000 (made)
descriptive_line
dimensions
Height: 49 cm approx., Width: 60 cm approx.
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
Something that I'll Never Really See: Contemporary Photography from the V&A (Cartwright Hall, Bradford 24/01/2009-19/03/2009) Something that I'll Never Really See: Contemporary Photography from the V&A (Herbert Art Gallery 16/09/2008-11/01/2009) Something that I'll Never Really See: Contemporary Photography from the V&A (Hatton Gallery, Newcastle 27/06/2008-21/08/2008) Something that I'll Never Really See: Contemporary Photography from the V&A (Nottingham Castle Museum and Art Gallery 03/05/2008-15/06/2008) Something that I'll Never Really See: Contemporary Photography from the V&A (artsdepot, Finchley, London 24/01/2008-31/03/2008) Something that I'll Never Really See: Contemporary Photography from the V&A (Sainsbury Centre, Norwich 01/05/2007-24/06/2007) Stepping In & Out. Contemporary Documentary Photography (Victoria & Albert Museum 01/01/2002-31/12/2003)
gallery
historical_context_note
historical_significance
history_note
This photograph was acquired for the V&A futher to the display of a selection of work from Clare Richardson's Harlemville project in Stepping In & Out, Contemporary Documentary Photography, curated by Charlotte Cotton, Canon Photography Gallery, V&A, Sept 2002-January 2003
id
59232
label
Harlemville is a small community of people in north-east America that lives in accordance with the writings of the early twentieth century philosopher Rudolf Steiner. Clare Richardson first visited Harlemville in the spring of 2000, initially to spend time with a friend who was studying biodynamic farming, Steiner's agricultural practice. Richardson was immediately taken with the impact that this community's beliefs has on the rearing of their children - in particular, the emphasis that was placed on mobilising the 'imaginative world' of each child and the importance of story telling and play in developing this capacity in them. Richardson stepped into this community without being conscious of the connections this rarefied existence had with her own childhood or her photographic practice, but both elements became her links with Harlemville and the basis for the friendships that she formed. "I always kept my camera in my bag but often I wouldn't take it out for days. I'd find that I'd spend three days with the Harlemville community and though I might not have taken a picture during that time, when I did, the relationships I am forming are evident and come through in the pictures." This photograph was taken in Harlemville, a small community in North America which adheres to the philosophical writings of the philosopher, Rudolf Steiner, and his Waldorf schooling system. The community encourages freedom of expression, creativity and imagination and is underpinned by holistic and spiritual beliefs. This imbues especially the children who live there with an uninhibited self-confidence and sensibility to their to the environment that offers an alternative to mainstream American society. Richardson sensitively documents the events and atmosphere of this community, highlighting the children's immersion in nature. [2008-2009]
last_checked
2014-08-29T23:09:52.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-29T23:09:52.000Z
latitude
42.272141
location
In Storage
longitude
-73.592583
marks
materials
materials_techniques
C-type print
museum_number
E.2050-2004
museum_number_token
e20502004
object_number
O91288
object_type
Photograph
on_display
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
Colour photograph of three boys, their bare torsos covered in mud
place
Harlemville
primary_image_id
production_note
This photograph was made at Harlemville, a small community in north east America that lives in accordance with the writings of the early 20th century philosopher Rudolf Steiner
production_type
public_access_description
In spring 2000 British photographer Clare Richardson visited Harlemville, a town in New York state where a large community of people live according to the ethos of the Austrian philosopher and scientist Rudolph Steiner. According to Steiner’s doctrine, the imaginative life of children should be encouraged through free expression, creativity and play. Richardson documented the everyday activities of Harlemville’s children, capturing a sense of a Utopian but fragile innocence. Photographing the community over the course of a year, Richardson gradually gained the trust of its members. She has described her way of working on this project as follows: ‘I’d find that I’d spend three days with the Harlemville community and, though I might not have taken a picture during that time, when I did, the relationships I was forming were evident and came through in the pictures.’
related_museum_numbers
rights
2
shape
site_code
slug
harlemville-v-photograph-richardson-clare
sys_updated
2013-08-25T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
title
Harlemville V
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
2000
year_start
2000