Afro Lunar Lovers

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Acquired in 2003 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Ofili, Chris
attributions_note
bibliography
collection_code
PDP
credit
Purchased through the Julie and Robert Breckman Print Fund
date_end
2003-12-31
date_start
2003-01-01
date_text
2003 (made)
descriptive_line
Chris Ofili: Afro Lunar Lovers, 2003. Colour inkjet print with gold leaf and embossing
dimensions
Height: 49 cm sheet, Width: 31.9 cm sheet
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
gallery
Prints & Drawings Study Room, level E
historical_context_note
historical_significance
history_note
id
47308
label
last_checked
2014-08-29T22:29:28.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-29T22:29:28.000Z
latitude
54.313919
location
Prints & Drawings Study Room, level E, case MP, shelf 268
longitude
-2.23218
marks
'Afro Lunar Lovers' '2003 Chris Ofili' '109/350'
materials
paper, gold leaf, colour printing ink
materials_techniques
Colour inkjet print, with gold leaf and embossing
museum_number
E.1043-2003
museum_number_token
e10432003
object_number
O88402
object_type
Print
on_display
1
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
Image of two (male and female) black figures, three-quarter length, facing three-quarter frontal, he in tuxedo, she in bright green shoulderless dress standing slightly to left, above, to the right a bright gold moon in a red sky/background. The eyes of the figures also picked out in gold.
place
Great Britain
primary_image_id
production_note
Attribution note: The print was produced to celebrate Ofili's election to represent Britain at the Venice Biennale 2003 Reason For Production: Retail
production_type
Limited edition
public_access_description
Chris Ofili is one of the best-known artists working in Britain today. He is also black. His work has been extremely popular but also controversial, particularly for his use of elephant dung as a material in his paintings, and for his presentation of stereotypes. His treatment of the black figure has been a mixture of parody, irony and reverence. He confronts his public with images that clearly refer to 'blaxploitation' movies, golliwogs, and so on. By doing so he asserts the idea that 'black' art itself does not have to fit stereotypes and conventional expectations in order to merit visibility and inclusion. In 2003 Ofili was chosen to represent Britain at the Venice Biennale. By then, he was already working with imagery that referred to African nationalism in a series of figure paintings, predominantly red, green and black. (These are the colours of the Pan-African flag or the Standard of the Universal Negro Improvement Association flag, devised in 1920 by the father of Black Nationalism, Marcus Garvey.) Continuing this theme, the Venice pictures took on an overtly romantic air, with a loving black couple featuring in most of them. Despite the irony, the images are both tender and complex. This print, produced in collaboration with the Victoria Miro gallery, captures the translucent and luminous qualities of the paintings.
related_museum_numbers
rights
2
shape
site_code
VA
slug
afro-lunar-lovers-print-ofili-chris
sys_updated
2014-01-29T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
embossing, colour ink jet
title
Afro Lunar Lovers
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
2003
year_start
2003