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Acquired in 1866 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Unknown
attributions_note
bibliography
collection_code
MET
credit
date_end
1860-12-31
date_start
1800-01-01
date_text
1800-1860 (made)
descriptive_line
Cross of blue glass, marbled like agate, with metal mounts double-plated in gilded silver, Russia, 19th century.
dimensions
Height: 6.3 cm, Width: 3.5 cm, Depth: 0.9 cm
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
gallery
historical_context_note
historical_significance
history_note
id
460
label
last_checked
2014-08-29T19:20:23.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-29T19:20:23.000Z
latitude
59.461479
location
In Storage
longitude
108.831779
marks
materials
Glass, plated
materials_techniques
Glass mounted in metal double-plated with gilding over silver
museum_number
102-1866
museum_number_token
1021866
object_number
O116987
object_type
Cross
on_display
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
Rectangular cross of blue glass, marbled to look like agate, with the ends encased in square metal mounts which are doubly plated with gold over silver. There is a ring attached to each of the vertical sides of each mount, and there is a small pyramid of granules on each of the ends. The cross is hinged to a square bead with truncated corners with a highly stylised engraved face of Christ (the Vernicle) on its front, with identifying Cyrillic characters above it. There is a small pyramid of granules on the top face of the bead.
place
Russia
primary_image_id
production_note
production_type
public_access_description
Before the revolution of 1917, almost all Orthodox Russians wore pendant crosses. Most are made of cast silver, and they are very difficult to date accurately, as the same designs were used unchanged for centuries. This cross is very primitive in appearance, with its core of marbled glass set in gilded metal mounts. It was described as 17th century when it was acquired in 1866, but is more likely to be 19th century in date. It hangs from a square bead with a stylised image of the face of Christ on the front, which is often used with Russian Orthodox pendants. The image, called the Vernicle, is derived from a miraculous portrait which is said to have appeared on the Veil of Veronica after she wiped Christ's face with it on the road to Calvary. It would originally have been worn on a long filigree chain.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
slug
cross-unknown
sys_updated
2013-08-17T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
title
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
1860
year_start
1800