No Title

2006ap6099 jpg l

View the V&A API .json response

Acquired in 1931 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Unknown
attributions_note
bibliography
collection_code
T&F
credit
Bequeathed by Alfred Percival Maudslay
date_end
1890-12-31
date_start
1875-01-01
date_text
1875-1890 (made)
descriptive_line
Woven cotton; Mexico; 1875-1890
dimensions
Length: 91 in, Width: 30 in
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
A Glimpse of Guatemala: The Maudslay Bequest of 19th century Guatemalan Textiles (Victoria & Albert Museum 17/02/1996-18/08/1996)
gallery
historical_context_note
historical_significance
history_note
Registered File no. 2743/1931.
id
421
label
Shawl, with blue and white cotton warp and white cotton weft. The resist-dyed pattern in some of the warp threads is known as jaspe and was a popular way of decorating fabric used for shawls and for skirts. Shawls such as this would have been woven commercially on a treadle loom (introduced by the Spaniards in the 16th century) and would have been sold by merchants in village markets.
last_checked
2014-08-29T19:20:12.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-29T19:20:12.000Z
latitude
23.62574
location
In Storage
longitude
-101.956253
marks
materials
cotton (textile)
materials_techniques
Plain weave cotton, warp ikat
museum_number
T.21-1931
museum_number_token
t211931
object_number
O11105
object_type
Rebozo
on_display
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
Cotton rebozo woven with a pattern of alternating stripes of blue, blue/white ikat, blue, white, blue/white ikat, blue, narrow white, blue, blue/white ikat and white. At either end there is a warp fringe formed by single knots. 1931 description: Scarf, woven with a tinted cotton warp. 1975 description: Perraje Jaspeado (tied-dyed shawl). This is a typical example of a two colour (indigo blue/white) perraje where some stripes have simple jaspe patterning. The weft in this example is white cotton; the weave is warp-faced. JASPE is the Indian term for tied-dyed yarns; JASPEADO describes the cloth woven from these yarns.
place
Mexico
primary_image_id
2006AP6099
production_note
When acquired by the Museum in 1931 it was thought possible that this textile might have been woven in Switzerland, or that the yarn might have been dyed/printed in Switzerland. Ann P Rowe (Curator of Western Hemisphere Textiles, The Textile Museum, Washington DC: personal communication 1997) said this and other rebozos in the Maudslay Collection look more like Mexican than Guatemalan products and the presence of other Mexican textiles in his Collection means that such an attribution would not be out of line. Mexican rebozos, both old and new, use more finely spun yarms and have narrower stripes than do Guatemalan ones. The Eisen Collection made in Guatemala in 1902 contains nothing similar although a shawl that might be similar to this was illustrated by Josephine Wood in 'Indian Costumes of Guatemala', Austria, 1966 p.42).
production_type
public_access_description
The resist-dyed pattern in some of the warp threads is known as jaspe and was a popular way of decorating fabric used for shawls and for skirts. Shawls such as this would have been woven commercially on a treadle loom (introduced by the Spaniards in the 16th century) and would have been sold by merchants in village markets.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
slug
rebozo-unknown
sys_updated
2013-08-17T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
Weaving, ikat
title
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
1890
year_start
1875