No Title

2006am9229 jpg l

View the V&A API .json response

Acquired in 1877 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Unknown
attributions_note
bibliography
collection_code
EAS
credit
date_end
date_start
date_text
1200 BC - 300 BC (made)
descriptive_line
Jar, earthenware, Final Jomon period, 1200 BC - 300 BC
dimensions
Height: 17.5 cm, Diameter: 17.5 cm
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
gallery
World Ceramics, room 145
historical_context_note
historical_significance
history_note
id
416271
label
last_checked
2014-08-30T16:44:37.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-30T16:44:37.000Z
latitude
37.487598
location
World Ceramics, room 145, case 2, shelf 1
longitude
139.838287
marks
materials
earthenware
materials_techniques
Earthenware, hand-built with rope-impressed low-relief patterning; bonfire fired
museum_number
160-1877
museum_number_token
1601877
object_number
O496428
object_type
Jar
on_display
true
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
Small jar with flat base, full body and tall upright mouth with rolled rim; the waist and shoulders decorated in a low-relief spiral pattern with impressed rope marks visible on the raised areas; remains of four small lugs around base of neck and a single large knotted device on the mouthrim; patches of grey on the mainly pinkish brown body are evidence of the jar having been fired in a bonfire
place
Japan
primary_image_id
2006AM9229
production_note
production_type
public_access_description
This jar is an example of the type of earthenware produced by the Jomon people, who inhabited the Japanese archipelago from the 14th to the first millennium BC. Jomon (literally 'rope pattern') wares, from which the name of the culture that produced them is derived, are among the earliest ceramics ever made. They reached a peak of sophistication in terms of complexity of shape and patterning during the Middle Jomon period (3500-2500 BC), after which, as in the case of this piece, their decorative schemes become increasingly simpler. The meaning of the patterning found on this and comparable vessels is unknown, but archaeologists are generally agreed that it had some kind of ceremonial or ritual significance.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
VA
slug
jar-unknown
sys_updated
2013-08-16T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
Unglazed
title
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
-300
year_start
-1200