No Title

2007bm7247 jpg l

View the V&A API .json response

Acquired in 2000 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
attributions_note
bibliography
Liefkes, Reino and Hilary Young (eds.) Masterpieces of World Ceramics in the Victoria and Albert Museum. London: V&A Publishing, 2008, pp. 20-21.
collection_code
EAS
credit
Bought with funds from Mr. T.T. Tsui
date_end
date_start
date_text
ca. 2500 BC (made)
descriptive_line
Tripod vessel, white earthenware, Shandong Province, China, ca.2500 BC.
dimensions
Height: 26.0 cm, Width: 16.5 cm
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
gallery
World Ceramics, room 145
historical_context_note
historical_significance
history_note
id
39647
label
Ewer with three feet China, Shandong province About 2500 bc This early ewer was made from the same kaolin-rich clay as porcelain. But at this date high-temperature porcelain kilns had not been invented. The clay was therefore fired below 1050ºC and has remained a porous earthenware. Kaolin is more resistant to heat than other clays. This fact, together with the ewer’s distinctive shape, suggests that it was placed over a fire for boiling water. Unglazed earthenware Museum no. FE.8-2000 Purchased with funds from Mr T.T. Tsui [September 2009]
last_checked
2014-08-29T22:01:54.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-29T22:01:54.000Z
latitude
36.894451
location
World Ceramics, room 145, case 45
longitude
104.165649
marks
materials
earthenware
materials_techniques
White earthenware
museum_number
FE.8-2000
museum_number_token
fe82000
object_number
O46756
object_type
Ewer
on_display
true
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
Tripod vessel with large spout and handle, made of white unglazed earthenware and decorated with a narrow pinched motif on the shoulders.
place
China
primary_image_id
2007BM7247
production_note
Shandong Province
production_type
public_access_description
The great importance of this piece is that it is made from kaolin-rich clays, the same raw material used for porcelain, and had it been fired to a higher temperature it could be described as porcellaneous or as 'proto-porcelain'. However, the firing range of Neolithic kilns seldom exceeded 1,050°C, which means that the ewer was fired at much the same temperature as Neolithic earthenwares, and the body has remained porous rather than become vitrified during firing. The common raw material for Neolithic Chinese ceramics is loess, a wind-borne dust derived from igneous rocks (rocks formed from molten magma or lava), not kaolin-rich clays. This is because in northern China the latter was usually found beneath the loess and hence was more difficult to obtain. Kaolin clays were deposited earlier than loess: some 260 million years old, they were laid down when huge carboniferous forests flourished in north China. The mud on which these forests grew was of kaolin-rich sediments, washed by the rain from distant rocky highlands. Made 1,000 years before writing was invented in China, there is no textual source to explain the function of this distinctive vessel. Its form, with three bag-shaped legs, strap handle and spout, suggests it was a ewer in which water was boiled. The use of kaolin cays by the aboriginal potter could have been sheer coincidence, or it may have been deliberate, as the material had a superior resistance to the thermal shock that occurred, for example, when liquids were heated over a fire.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
VA
slug
ewer
sys_updated
2013-08-17T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
Unglazed
title
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
-2496
year_start
-2505