No Title

2006at6142 jpg l

View the V&A API .json response

Acquired in 1936 (the spelunker thinks)

artist
Unknown
attributions_note
bibliography
Ming Wilson, 'Liangzhu Jades Rediscovered' in Oriental Art, Winter 1995/96, pp.2-8. Ming Wilson, Chinese Jades, 2004, no.12
collection_code
EAS
credit
Purchased with the assistance of The Art Fund, the Vallentin Bequest, Sir Percival David and the Universities China Committee
date_end
date_start
date_text
ca. 2500 BC (made)
descriptive_line
Axe head, nephrite, Liangzhu, circa 2500 BC
dimensions
Height: 12.5 cm, Width: 8.5 cm, Diameter: 0.6 cm hole
edition_number
event_text
exhibition_history
gallery
historical_context_note
historical_significance
history_note
id
34484
label
last_checked
2014-08-29T21:44:02.000Z
last_processed
2014-08-29T21:44:02.000Z
latitude
36.894451
location
In Storage
longitude
104.165649
marks
materials
materials_techniques
Nephrite jade, carved
museum_number
A.64-1936
museum_number_token
a641936
object_number
O39440
object_type
Axe head
on_display
original_currency
original_price
physical_description
Variegated dark green and grey. Near the hole, on both sides, are marks of the cord that joined the axe to a wooden shaft.
place
China
primary_image_id
2006AT6142
production_note
Liangzhu culture
production_type
public_access_description
Knife-shaped and axe-shaped blades made from stone were probably working tools in Neolithic societies. The Chinese also made blades from jade. This beautiful mineral is hard but brittle, so the blades are unlikely to have been put to practical use. Instead they would have been held by chieftains as symbols of authority. Large quantities of jade blades have been excavated in different regions in China, indicating their widespread use over a span of more than 3,000 years.
related_museum_numbers
rights
3
shape
site_code
slug
axe-head-unknown
sys_updated
2013-08-17T00:00:00.000Z
techniques
title
updated
vanda_exhibition_history
year_end
-2496
year_start
-2505